DEVELOPING A CULTURE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE

DEVELOPING A CULTURE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE

Enhancing patient outcomes, incorporating the most up-to-date evidence-based practices, and ensuring the implementation of the safest interventions while maintaining a strong knowledge base are among the paramount aspects of the nursing profession.

Dissemination, as a well-thought-out process, necessitates careful consideration of the intended audience and the specific contexts where research findings will be received. Additionally, it involves, when appropriate, engaging in effective communication with broader policy and healthcare audiences. This multifaceted approach aims to facilitate the integration of research findings into decision-making processes and clinical practice. Successful dissemination is essentially about delivering research findings to those individuals who can apply them, with the goal of maximizing the research’s impact without unnecessary delays (NIHR, 2019).

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Stories from a Person Who’s Been a Patient and Wants to Be a Nurse

I propose two dissemination strategies. The first strategy involves presenting the research interactively in smaller, targeted groups of stakeholders, aiming to demonstrate the effectiveness of the findings and capture their attention. The second strategy revolves around utilizing online communication methods, particularly through platforms like Zoom or other accessible forums, to facilitate interactive knowledge-sharing sessions with healthcare providers (Mallonee et al., 2018). Employing a combination of dissemination strategies ensures a comprehensive approach to sharing information and encourages healthcare employees to put it into practice. Furthermore, it is vital to equip nurses and stakeholders with brochures or concise lists of care recommendations, emphasizing their proven efficacy in benefiting other patients based on research findings (Melnyk et al., 2011).

However, I am less inclined to employ the strategy of presenting to larger groups or using traditional PowerPoint presentations. Potential limitations associated with this approach include the risk of reduced attention and lower levels of engagement. It is essential to remain mindful of varying perspectives and cultural differences when introducing new information, as these factors can significantly impact the effectiveness of dissemination efforts (NIHR, 2019).

References

How to disseminate your research. NIHR. (2019, January). Retrieved from https://www.nihr.ac.uk/documents/how-to-disseminate-your-research/19951

Mallonee, S., Phillips, J., Holloway, K., & Riggs, D. (2018). Training providers in the use of evidence-based treatments: A comparison of in-person and online delivery modes. Psychology Learning & Teaching, 17(1), 61-72.

Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Gallagher-Ford, L., & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-based practice, step by step: Sustaining evidence-based practice through organizational policies and an innovative model. American Journal of Nursing, 111(9), 57–60.

 Reply to Comment

Jordyn,

Your post is insightful! You mentioned that one of your preferred dissemination strategies involves presenting research interactively within smaller groups, which is an excellent approach to engage your target audience effectively and maintain their attention. I agree that this strategy can be highly engaging. On the other hand, you expressed reluctance to use PowerPoint presentations due to concerns about audience engagement. While I understand your perspective, there are ways to address this challenge.

One approach to enhance PowerPoint presentations is to make them interactive. You can achieve this by incorporating questions during the presentation, using multimedia elements like videos, and ensuring that the content remains concise. By doing so, PowerPoint presentations can become effective tools for dissemination. As noted by Lim (2012), factors such as your posture, tone and volume of your voice, eye contact with the audience, and even your attire can significantly influence the success of your PowerPoint presentation. If you are genuinely engaged and demonstrate enthusiasm during the presentation, your audience is more likely to be engaged as well.

Moreover, it’s essential to follow best practices when creating PowerPoint slides. For instance, adhering to the guideline of no more than eight words per bullet point and a maximum of six bullets per slide can prevent overcrowding and improve the clarity and impact of your presentation (Nowak et al., 2014). This approach ensures that the audience can focus on the key messages without being overwhelmed by excessive text.

By implementing these strategies, PowerPoint presentations can be transformed into engaging and effective tools for disseminating research findings to a broader audience.

Fostering a Culture of Evidence-Based Practice

In the realm of healthcare, evidence-based practice (EBP) represents a crucial approach that amalgamates data from patient care, research studies, clinical expertise, patient preferences, and established standards. This multifaceted approach aims to address healthcare challenges effectively (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020). For nurses, it is paramount to cultivate a culture of EBP within their practice. Such a culture empowers healthcare professionals and makes a substantial impact on delivering optimal care to patients (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020). The focus of this week’s discussion revolves around dissemination strategies, a key aspect of promoting EBP.

Exploring Dissemination Strategies

Dissemination, as a term, refers to the targeted distribution of information and intervention materials to specific audiences within public health or clinical practice. It is a pivotal component in extending the reach of evidence and enhancing people’s motivation and ability to utilize evidence in decision-making and practice (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020). Well-planned dissemination strategies play a significant role in increasing access to guidelines and ultimately improving health outcomes (Evidence-based Practice Center Systematic Review Protocol Project Title, n.d.). Effective dissemination involves careful consideration of the target audience, the message to be conveyed, and the communication strategies that will facilitate successful knowledge transfer (Evidence-based Practice Center Systematic Review Protocol Project Title, n.d.).

Among the dissemination strategies I would choose to implement, two stand out. Firstly, publishing project findings in statewide publications and journals allows for a wide-reaching dissemination of knowledge. Additionally, multidisciplinary team huddles provide an excellent opportunity for sharing insights and engaging with stakeholders in presenting program results. These strategies are appealing due to their potential for fostering active participation in the learning process.

A Less Preferred Dissemination Strategy

Conversely, some dissemination strategies give rise to reservations. For example, the use of social media and news media, while influential in shaping health policies, can lead to varying audience perceptions and differing literacy levels, potentially provoking offense in response to healthcare narratives in the media. In academic circles, professional social networks such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu have gained popularity, as they provide a platform for researchers to connect and share their work (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020). As per Ross-Hellauer et al. (2020), the most consistently effective interventions include educational outreach and academic detailing. Multifaceted interventions combining various strategies tend to outperform single interventions. Nevertheless, common barriers to communication and dissemination, such as limited exposure to information, can hinder its utilization in decision-making (Evidence-based Practice Center Systematic Review Protocol Project Title, n.d.). In the digital age, various non-traditional modes, such as social media, blogs, and wikis, have emerged as valuable tools for sharing knowledge (Evidence-based Practice Center Systematic Review Protocol Project Title, n.d.).

Overcoming Dissemination Barriers

Barriers can pose challenges to the successful implementation of dissemination strategies. For instance, time constraints might render certain approaches impractical in multidisciplinary team huddles. Ensuring the quality and objectivity of publications and journals can be a significant concern, as it relates to the potential for bias protection. The issue of directness and consistency in disseminating health information may reduce the certainty of positive health outcomes. To surmount these obstacles, meticulous planning and audience analysis before implementing dissemination strategies are essential. Identifying the characteristics of the target audience is a fundamental step in crafting effective dissemination strategies. This understanding helps tailor the approach to the specific needs and preferences of the recipients, enhancing the likelihood of successful knowledge transfer.

  • Collapse SubdiscussionAmanda Sutherland 

    I would implement the use of practice champions and unit or organization-level workshops taught by evidence based practice (EBP) mentors as EBP dissemination strategies. Both strategies are supported by the fourth key concept of a high reliability health care organization (HRHO) described as deference to expertise (Melnyk, 2012), in this case clinical.

    I would be likely to use the practice champions dissemination strategy (Melnyk & Overholt, 2018) due to the effectiveness of training a group of ‘super-users’ who then assist colleagues to implement a practice transformation. This strategy is also used with success in other areas like technology change implementation. The concept is aligned with the Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC) Model suggesting the use of Evidence Based Practice (EBP) mentors who are advanced practice subject area experts with training in organizational change models who spread best practices through collaboration (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). It is a dissemination strategy with proven outcome improvement (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). Barriers to use of practice champions include mentor or super-user recruitment and training. Budgetary limitations may preclude payment of practice champions, in which case other creative recruitment incentives such as flexing schedules or one-time bonuses may be needed. There is also a significant investment of time and education required to prepare the mentors, which may increase problems with recruitment and retention, as well as place an additional demand on the training and education department.

    A second organizational change strategy I would employ for implementation of evidence based practice change is unit-level or organizational level workshops with nurse educators. Direct teaching has evidence in support of its use in introductory level nurse training (Higuchi, Cragg, Diem, Molnar, & O’Donohue, 2006). Scheduling trainings and tracking of education for licensure documentation purposes are two potential barriers to the use of workshops. Scheduling trainings to maximize the efficiency and numbers of staff reached is also a challenge when training nurses who may work many different schedules. Documentation of training is important for regulatory, licensure, and magnet status, but may be more difficult to organize if an informal mentor system is used to disseminate best practices. One way to overcome these issues is by staging Education Days throughout one month each year and requiring nurses to self-register for one day. Each nurse would have a ‘passport’ with a list of the required training topics and would visit each booth in an auditorium to be taught and endorsed on the skill or practice change by the nurse educator at that booth. The booths would use a combination of poster presentations, direct teaching and return demonstration. Once completed, the nurse submits his or her passport. This system not only allows nurses to schedule at their convenience, it completes the needed documentation of training for regulatory purposes.

    At this point in my education, I would be least likely to use publication in peer-reviewed journals or conference presentations due to my lack of experience with submitting research for publication or presenting to conference attendees. Submitting research articles and giving podium presentations do have the potential to reach larger audiences than trained EBP mentors or institution-level workshops. I aspire to that level of academic expertise.

    References

    Higuchi, K. A., Cragg, C. E., Diem, E., Molnar, J., & O’Donohue, M. S. (2006). Integrating clinical

    guidelines into nursing education. International journal of nursing education

                scholarship3.https://doi.org/10.2202/1548-923X.1223

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing &

                healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.

    Melnyk, B. M. (2012). Achieving a high-reliability organization through implementation of the

    ARCC model for systemwide sustainability of evidence-based practice. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 36(2), 127–135.                doi:10.1097/NAQ.0b013e318249fb6a

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionVictavian Jackson 

      Good Point Amanda,

      I agree practice champions are the dissemination strategy I would choose to implement quality improvement projects in the hospital. Nursing best practice champions promote evidence-based culture and respond to the needs of point-of-care nurses and other health professionals in adopting evidence-based practices (Mount & Anderson, 2015, p. 37). For example, when my facility converted to an electric health record (EHR) called EPIC, they opened up opportunities to become practice champions. The practice champion’s role during the conversion was to help support staff nurses and other healthcare professionals with EPIC-related issues. The second dissemination strategy I would choose is workshops and seminars. Seminars and Unit-level workshops are the top methods for nurses to learn about new research (Brownson et al., 2018, p. 105). For example, at my facility, I am a Clinical Nurse III, which is a leadership role as a floor nurse. My role is to attend 80% of all staff meetings and assist with workshops such as Sepsis prevention. Workshops and seminars address common problems that healthcare professionals face frequently in the hospital.

      References:

      Mount, A., & Anderson, I. (2015). Driving change—not just a walk in the park: the role of the nurse champion in sustained change. Nurse Leader13(4), 36–38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mnl.2015.06.003Links to an external site.

      Brownson, R. C., Eyler, A. A., Harris, J. K., Moore, J. B., & Tabak, R. G. (2018). Getting the word out: new approaches for disseminating public health science. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice24(2), 102–111. https://doi.org/10.1097/phh.0000000000000673Links to an external site.

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionSheila Ankrah 

      Response to Amanda,

      Hi Amanda,

      EBP Information Disseminating Strategies

      Thanks for this week’s post. I am happy that you mentioned active dissemination strategies, like social networks that would include Facebook, Twitter, and many more to disseminate evidence-based information. On the contrary, I will be more inclined to favor using this strategy in spreading evidence-based information rather than picking it as my least information disseminating strategy.  According to Saykili & Genç Kumtepe (2019), since Facebook was established in 2004 initially for Harvard University students, it has reached over 2.2 billion active users worldwide. It has become the most popular social networking site. This teaming population attracted by this network makes it to be a powerful tool in sharing EBP information. Some evidence has been provided in recent years to show that networking can provide enhanced EBP (Ruiz-Román et al., 2019).

      References

      Ruiz-Román, C., Molina, L., & Alcaide, R. (2019). “We Have a Common Goal”: Support Networks For the Educational and Social Development of Children in Disadvantaged Areas. British Journal of Social Work, 49(6), 1658–1676. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcz063

      Saykili A., Genç Kumtepe E. (2019) Educational Use of Facebook: A Comparison of Worldwide Examples and Turkish Context. In: Väljataga T., Laanpere M. (eds) Digital Turn in Schools—Research, Policy, Practice. Lecture Notes in Educational Technology. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-7361-9_17

       

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionSheena Grays 

      Amanda,

       

      Great post! I agree with you on using practice champions as a dissemination strategy. Research shows that practice champions encourage best practice guidelines through teaching and mentoring (Impacts of evidence use-hard hitting or subtle change?, 2010). They also can be very influential practice leaders at interdisciplinary meetings that will assist in getting colleges and stakeholders on board with the new guidelines. The practice champion will assist in establishing trust with the employees and stakeholders, allowing an easy transition when rolling out new evidence-based practices within the company (Impacts of evidence use-hard hitting or subtle change?, 2010). Practice champions will set the standard for the new culture by implementing the latest practices, which will draw employee interest and may help conquer challenges in changing the organization’s culture (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018).

      References

      Impacts of evidence use-hard hitting or subtle change? (2010). Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing7(1), 1-3. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-6787.2009.00181.xLinks to an external site.

      Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionStephen Chege 

      Response 2.

      Great post, Amanda.

      Implementing evidence-based practice is essential in improving the quality of care provided to patients. The healthcare organization must establish a practical model that promotes positive EBP perception. As you mention in your post, identifying EBP champions, corporate workshops taught by nurse educators, and providing direct in-unit education can yield positive results in how EBP is perceived. I have witnessed the benefit of identifying champions within the healthcare organization to push for positivity when establishing a new practice at any level of care. My organization recently adopted the “Mandt” behavior crisis prevention program, changing from crisis prevention (CPI). There is overwhelming reluctance in the perception of the new behavior crisis prevention program within the hospital. The staff development has established champion meetings before the new system goes live.

      Dean, Gallagher & Connor(2021) appraise the importance of providing a structured guide describing the clinical area of focus and implementing the EBP approach. Beckett & Powell (2021) support poster presentation when disseminating EBP. The healthcare organization can use poster presentations to engage the staff by creating appealing colors, poster appearances, and content organization. The healthcare organization can use poster presentations to disseminate the critical components of EBP.

      Reference

      Beckett, C. D., & Powell, J. (2021). Dissemination of Evidence‐Based Practice Projects: Key Strategies for Successful Poster Presentations. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 18(3), 158–160. https://doi.org/10.1111/wvn.12502

      Dean, J., Gallagher, F. L., & Connor, L. (2021). Evidence‐Based Practice: A New Dissemination Guide. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 18(1), 4–7. https://doi.org/10.1111/wvn.12489

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionRita Osei

    Strategies for Disseminating EBP

    Evidence Base Practice (EBP) requires well-established strategies. The major reason for using effective strategies is to improve the accessibility of the information and ensure effective EBP implementation. The discussion focuses on the EBP dissemination strategies which am likely to use and the ones which I may not consider with specific validations.

    Dissemination strategies to use

    The first strategy I am most likely to use in the organization is unit-level presentation. Secondly, I would also focus on the local distribution strategy. The major reason for considering the strategies is their ability to embrace the local institutions’ key players (Melnyk et al., 2018). With such strategies, it is also easy to record better institutional development. Some of the best drivers while using the strategies include technical skills and local resources. Institutional development is necessary since it is based on service delivery. The strategies are also fundamental since they would improve flexibility and enhance positive changes. Besides, department-level presentation is fundamental since it reduces challenges and conflicts that are likely to emerge. It is also strategic and embraces evidence practice as a key solution to eliminate uncertainties. Therefore, using the listed dissemination strategies is fundamental for improving long-term learning and effective implementation of the EBP.

    Dissemination Strategies least inclined to use

    The dissemination strategy that I would be least inclined to use is poster presentations. Regardless of the ease of poster presentation, it may not contain vital information essential for EBP implementation (Gallagher-Ford et al., 2020). EBP implementation requires a well-established dissemination strategy that contains vital information. Therefore, since the poster may leave out vital information, it would not be feasible to consider it.

    Barriers when using the strategies and Approaches to overcome them

    Unit-level presentations and local distribution dissemination strategies are accompanied by specific barriers and need to be addressed for effective EBP implementation. According to Melnyk et al. (2018) barriers always exist regardless of the dissemination strategies and local and unit-level presentations are not exempted. For instance, staff resistance may be outlined as a major barrier, especially during the unit-level presentation. I would overcome this barrier by motivating the employees and using clear presentations that are not likely to affect the participants in any way. The approach would attract employees and eradicate resistance problems that may impact the overall outcome. Secondly, accessing information on peer-reviewed articles can also act as a critical barrier (Newhouse et al., 2019). It would reduce the number of individuals accessing the information. To address such an issue, it is vital to synthesize the information and ensure it is properly assessed. It is also easy to make the information accessible online to avoid such issues. Therefore, whenever such aspects are considered, it would be easy to achieve better outcomes.

    Lastly, EBP requires well-established strategies. The major reason for using effective strategies is to improve the accessibility of the information and ensure effective EBP implementation. I would like to use unit-level presentation and the local distribution strategy. The major reason for considering the strategies is their ability to embrace the local institutions’ key players. With such strategies, it is also easy to record better institutional development. Some of the best drivers while using the strategies include technical skills and local resources. Therefore, successful implementation of the EBP relies on dissemination strategies.

    References

    Gallagher-Ford, Lynn, Ellen Fineout-Overholt, Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, and Susan B. Stillwell. “Evidence-based practice, step by step: implementing an evidence-based practice change.” AJN the American Journal of Nursing 111, no. 3 (2020): 54-60.

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Gallagher-Ford, L., & Stillwell, S. B. (2018). Evidence-based practice, step by step: sustaining evidence-based practice through organizational policies and an innovative model. AJN the American Journal of Nursing111(9), 57-60.

    Newhouse, R. P., Dearholt, S., Poe, S., Pugh, L. C., & White, K. M. (2019). Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration37(12), 552-557.

     Reply to Comment

Promoting a Culture of Evidence-Based Practice

In the realm of nurse research, effective dissemination of findings holds paramount importance. It serves as the bridge that allows researchers to share their evidence-based practice (EBP) results with their intended audience. Nevertheless, many nurse researchers grapple with the challenge of selecting the most suitable strategy for disseminating their findings effectively. Despite these challenges, there are several viable options available, and one can choose to publish their research in peer-reviewed journals or opt for podium presentations to share their EBP evidence with precision, ultimately enhancing practice outcomes.

Among the multitude of dissemination strategies, two emerge as the most appealing for sharing EBP evidence: publication in peer-reviewed journals and podium presentations. When it comes to podium presentations, these involve the sharing of gathered information with stakeholders at an institutional level. This method allows for real-time interaction, enabling audience members to ask questions and challenge the findings, thereby facilitating refinement and improvement of the research (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018; Newhouse et al., 2007). On the other hand, publication in peer-reviewed journals offers a unique advantage. It not only elevates the quality and reliability of the evidence but also ensures accessibility to a wider audience. The peer-review process acts as a validation mechanism, boosting the credibility of the findings. Moreover, since peer-reviewed journals are readily available online, they can reach a vast readership. An exemplary resource, the Journal of Advanced Nursing, offers a wealth of the latest publications in the field. Therefore, the strategies of publishing in peer-reviewed journals and podium presentations stand out as highly effective means to disseminate EBP evidence.

Conversely, there are certain dissemination strategies that hold less appeal. Poster presentations and publishing findings in local newspapers fall into this category. Poster presentations aim to capture the audience’s attention by highlighting key findings but possess certain drawbacks, primarily their lack of flexibility. Once printed and displayed, it becomes challenging to make corrections or updates. Furthermore, the success of a poster relies heavily on its visual appeal, and a dull presentation may fail to engage the target audience effectively. As for publishing findings in local newspapers, it comes with its own set of challenges. It can be difficult to reach the intended audience, as not everyone may read the newspaper on a particular day. Moreover, the prominence of the publication within the newspaper can significantly impact its visibility. If a research finding does not make the front page, it may go unnoticed by a large portion of the readership. Consequently, poster presentations and local newspaper publications are less likely to be my preferred avenues for disseminating EBP evidence.

In the process of disseminating findings via peer-reviewed journals and podium presentations, several primary barriers may be encountered. These challenges include a lack of collegial support, bureaucratic hurdles, financial costs, and difficulties in delivering effective presentations. When utilizing the peer-reviewed journals strategy, one notable obstacle is the financial burden, as many academic publishers require researchers to cover the cost of publication (Gallagher-Ford et al., 2011). Securing institutional support and overcoming bureaucratic barriers can also prove challenging. Moreover, successful podium presentations depend on the researcher’s presentation skills, including public speaking abilities, which may not be a strong suit for everyone. Engaging the audience through appropriate eye contact and body language is crucial, and a deficiency in these skills can hinder the comprehensive dissemination of evidence. In summary, while the dissemination of research findings presents its challenges, carefully chosen strategies such as publication in peer-reviewed journals and podium presentations offer effective means to share EBP evidence and enhance practice outcomes. Meanwhile, less preferred methods like poster presentations and local newspaper publications present limitations that may hinder their effectiveness. Overcoming barriers, including a lack of support, bureaucratic obstacles, costs, and presentation skills, is vital in ensuring the successful delivery of research findings to the intended audience.

  • References

    Forsyth, D. M., Wright, T. L., Scherb, C. A., & Gaspar, P. M. (2010). Disseminating evidence-based practice projects: Poster design and evaluation. Clinical Scholars Review3(1), 14-21. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kathleen-Hickey-5/publication/233508712_Long_QT_Syndrome_A_Case_Report_Genomics_and_Clinical_Implications/links/543facb20cf2fd72f99c9ec4/Long-QT-Syndrome-A-Case-Report-Genomics-and-Clinical-Implications.pdf#page=18

    Gallagher-Ford, L., Fineout-Overholt, E., Melnyk, B. M., & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-based practice, step by step: Implementing an evidence-based practice change. AJN The American Journal of Nursing111(3), 54-60. https://5y1.org/info/introduce-yourself-discussion-post_3_5689f3.html

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.

    Newhouse, R. P., Dearholt, S., Poe, S., Pugh, L. C., & White, K. M. (2007). Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration37(12), 552-557. https://doi.org/1097/01.NNA.0000302384.91366.8f.

      Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionLeslie Rasmussen 

    Module 5 Initial Discussion Post

    Disseminating EBP

    The main goal of disseminating evidence based practice is to facilitate the implementation of research findings into everyday practice or to start a program that utilizes evidence based improvement projects to improve an area (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). There are many ways to disseminate EBP into a workplace such as posters, publishing papers, speaking in front of an audience, write a new policy, utilize media, etc. (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018).

    Dissemination Strategies

    As a manager currently in the organization that I work in, I have had the opportunity to bring forth many things to the table that could improve patient safety or benefit our staff. When it comes to patient safety there is much evidence-based articles completed on many different topics. If there is something that I am interested in and I feel that it would be beneficial for my organization, I gather the information I need to be able to present this to the right staff. The two ways that I most often would disseminate EBP to my organization is by gathering data, complete write up such as an informational sheet and then presenting that to the proper channels above me at my organization. Going to the leaders first above me, we can reflect together on the evidence gathered and how it would improve the organization and/or patient care (Melnyk, 2012). Once it is discussed with her and she feels it may be appropriate then I would complete a presentation and bring it to our Quality Council meeting that we have once a month with all heads of departments and our medical director. Being able to hand out the EBP information in a hand out form but also being able to present it more in depth is a beneficial way to get your ideas looked at seriously.

    The two areas of dissemination that I would least likely use is media such as the media page for the facility and posting posters/write ups for the staff. There are many forms that are constantly being posted for the staff and many posts on our media page that many people ignore them. They get “reading fatigue” if you would call it and they skip over many things. So if it is something important I would like to speak about it in person myself to get their attention and to show them the importance of it.

    Barriers of Dissemination

    Getting the dissemination out to the leaders is not an issue because they are all very active in the organization, but being able to get this out to all the staff that it will affect can be difficult. Being able to educate them on their importance on any educational learning meetings regarding the project is important (Gallagher-Ford et al., 2011). But there are many times that not all staff come to these meetings, most times you only get the regulars or the ones that have been at the facility for a long time. When you get the same people repeatedly, we miss people in between. Then you must worry about other staff being taught by the regulars, and this is when information can be missed. There is a lot of turnover in the nursing field, losing staff that were educated can be an issue. Another area that can be difficult is the monthly Quality Council meetings have gotten postponed at times which means it can push back the project an entire month depending on when they decide to meet.

    Educating the staff and showing the importance of coming to educational meetings, continuous teaching to new staff in regards to any project improvements, continuous monitoring of the benefits of the new project and providing more than one presentation to be flexible for the staff is all important to try to get staff educated and to attend these meetings. With the Quality Council meetings being postpone, there is ways to communicate to the head of QA to discuss topics such as this. If we are unable to have a complete QA meeting, we can get department heads together as an interdisciplinary meeting to discuss the project and go from there if everyone is in agreement. There are ways around disseminating information to an organization, finding out which one will benefit you the most is important.

                                                         References

    Gallagher-Ford, L., Fineout-Overholt, E., Melnyk, B. M. & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-Based Practice,

    Step by Step: Implementing an Evidence-Based Practice Change. AJN, American Journal of

                                  Nursing, 111(3), 54-60. doi: 10.1097/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000395243.14347.7e.

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide

                                  to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.

    Melnyk, B. M. (2012). Achieving a High-Reliability Organization Through Implementation of the ARCC

    Model for Systemwide Sustainability of Evidence-Based Practice. Nursing Administration

                                  Quarterly, 36 (2), 127-135. doi: 10.1097/NAQ.0b013e318249fb6a.

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionDiana Boreland-Warden 

      Hello Leslie ,

      I enjoyed reading your post. It was very informative and provides the view of a nurse leader ready to inform. It is very important to know your staff and  understand the way that they function and develop. As you stated it is very important to present any and all information to your direct supervisors and leadership prior to presenting to your staff. Your supervisor can input any tips and direction on how to better present , educate and support the staff. Patient safety is a key indicator and hot topic. The dissemination of information that surrounds ensuring patient safety is critical. High-reliability health care organizations are those that provide care that is safe and one that minimizes errors while achieving exceptional performance in quality and safety( Melnyk , B. M. ,2012) . A presentation to your Quality council May not only benefit your unit. It may also benefit surrounding units as well. 

      I greatly appreciate your mention of reading fatigue. I always consider this when educating staff members. Information overload and reading fatigue greatly impact the amount of information absorbed by the learner. It is also important to engage and learn the stakeholders associated with your delivery.  Strategies to engage stakeholders include building trust and understanding their interest(Gallagher-Ford et al., 2011). 

      This is a great observation and acknowledgement on your part. 

      References

      Gallagher-Ford, L., Fineout-Overholt, E., Melnyk, B. M. & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-Based Practice,Step by Step: Implementing an Evidence-Based Practice Change. AJN, American Nursing, 111(3), 54-60. doi:10.1097/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000395243.14347.7e.

      Melnyk , B. M. (2012). Achieving a high-reliability organization through implementation of the ARCC model for systemwide sustainability of evidence-based practice. doi: 10.1097/NAQ.0b013e318249fb6a. PMID: 22407205.

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionSheila Ankrah 

    Main Post

    Developing a Culture of Evidence-Based Practice

    For nurses and other healthcare teams to make well-informed and founded decisions, they must base on the scientific research solutions incorporated in EBP. Through EBP, clinicians can stay updated about new medical protocols for patient care. By searching for documented interventions that fit the profiles of their patients, they can increase their patients’ chances for recovery. In the same vein, EBP enables nurses and other interdisciplinary care teams to evaluate the research to understand the risks or effectiveness of a diagnostic test or treatment. For this week’s discussion, I will reflect on dissemination strategies I believe will be essential in communicating EDP.

    Two Dissemination Strategies

    Dissemination is the targeted distribution of information and intervention materials to a specific public health or clinical practice audience. Dissemination of EBP has several goals, to increase the reach of evidence; improve people’s motivation to use and apply evidence; and increase people’s ability to use and apply evidence (The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ], 2018). Dissemination occurs through various channels; the two dissemination strategies or channels I would be most inclined to use are electronic poster presentations and Research games, such as a crossword puzzle or bingo.

    Electronic poster (e-poster) presentations serve as a tool to disseminate EBP within a healthcare facility. They are similar to traditional poster presentations but presented on a large computer screen. Well-constructed e-posters that are user-friendly may lead to the successful dissemination of EBP (Tripathy et al., 2017). The computer monitors may be placed in strategic locations where they can easily be seen; places such as break rooms and other high-traffic area increases the chances that the targeted audience will read the information. Being creative and trying to connect with as many potentially interested staff nurses as possible to build enthusiasm for evidence-based practice. Research games, such as a crossword puzzle or bingo, also can be used to disseminate EBP information.  To encourage participation, small prizes such as candies, pens, picture frames, and so on can be given out as incentives.

    Least Dissemination Strategy

    Based on personal experience, the least strategy I will use to disseminate EBP information is online modules that only require reading and a check-off box of “yes or no” in response. In most cases, people don’t pay much attention to the content. Mostly, people breeze through to get done without assimilating the information.

    Two Identified Barriers and How to overcome them

    Considering the crucial role of disseminating EBP into routine practice and policymaking, some barriers exist to limit EBP in becoming the standard of care, like in the electronic poster presentation. The first and obvious barrier is the lack of interactive sessions where some EBP information could be clarified. Inability to constitute a forum to answer questions can hinder getting the best evidence to apply to practice (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2019).  Electronic poster presentations also require more equipment, such as monitors at strategic locations; this makes it more expensive than the traditional poster boards. When it comes to research games such as crossword puzzles, it may distract from important tasks and focuses. Besides, some people may cheat in retrieving answers to crosswords, defeating its purpose in gaining more insights into EBP information.

    Instead of depending on the means mentioned above of disseminating EBP information, I will suggest periodic face-to-face meetings where such information could be disseminated. The regular face-to-face meeting where staff may be divided into groups so work schedule will not be interrupted. This kind of fora will be more interactive and allow the experts to clarify any information.

    References

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2019). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ] (2018). Communication and dissemination strategies to facilitate the use of health-related evidence. Retrieved from https://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/products/medical-evidence-communication/research-protocolLinks to an external site.

    Tripathy, J. P., Bhatnagar, A., Shewade, H. D., Kumar, A. V., Zachariah, R., & Harries, A. D. (2017). Ten tips to improve the visibility and dissemination of research for policymakers and practitioners. Public Health Action, 7(1), 10–14. https://doi.org/10.5588/pha.16.0090Links to an external site.

     

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionLeslie Rasmussen 

      Module 5 Discussion reply 2.

      Hi Sheila!

      When I was righting my discussion, I did not even think of online poster type of dissemination. We do have many computers around my facility and charting stations for the staff that are spread around. We have posted information on these computers before that staff do see. BUT an area that is a potential area for that is they are in the public eye. So, if it is information that you do not want families or patients to see this could possible be a barrier. Dissemination is still widely used by mouth and written papers, but thinking visual is another way to engage your audience (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020). Having the learning integrated into the systems that are used everyday is a great way to engage staff (Antunes & Pinheiro, 2020).

      I agree with you that online modules are not a great way to do things, I currently have to do a lot of online modules that are required in the entire facility and I can tell you that a lot of people let them play in the background and then just answer questions after, they are not learning anything. I do also agree with you that being there to answer questions or have the games to follow up on their questions is helpful and can keep them more engaged. I do like to speak to them personally but this can be difficult if not everyone shows up that I would want to be there as well.

       

       

                                                                                             References

      Antunes, H., & Pinheiro, P. (2020). Linking knowledge management, organizational learning and

      memory. Journal of Innovation and Knowledge, 5(2), 140-149.

      https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jik.2019.04.002

      Ross-Hellauer, T., Tennant,J., Banelytė,V., Gorogh,E., Luzi,D., Kraker, P., Pisacane, L., Ruggieri, R., Sifacaki,

      E., & Vignoli, E. (2020). Ten simple rules for innovative dissemination of research. PLOS

                           Computational Biology, 16(4). doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007704

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionJasmine London 

      Hi,

      Great post. I agree electronic posters would be an effective dissemination strategy. Disseminate findings through art or multimedia interpretations are a great way to introduce visual elements that can draw attention to your target audience (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020). Most healthcare organizations utilize computer monitors to display important information to staff because of how highly used technology is in healthcare. The e-poster would have to be well-designed that gives the viewer a concise overview of the research purpose, sample, results, and implications. I do think it would increase the chances of someone seeing the information however it could be easily overlooked or disregarded. Maybe the E-poster could advertise a webinar that would provide opportunity for the audience to learn about the research (Brownson et al., 2018).  I agree that the online modules can be an ineffective strategy.  It is easy to do it blindly without acknowledging the content.

       

      Ross-Hellauer, T., Tennant, J. P., Banelytė, V., Gorogh, E., Luzi, D., Kraker, P., Pisacane, L., Ruggieri, R., Sifacaki, E., & Vignoli, M. (2020). Ten simple rules for innovative dissemination of research. PLOS Computational Biology16(4), e1007704. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007704Links to an external site.

      Brownson, R. C., Eyler, A. A., Harris, J. K., Moore, J. B., & Tabak, R. G. (2018). Getting the Word Out: New Approaches for Disseminating Public Health Science. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice24(2), 102–111. https://doi.org/10.1097/phh.0000000000000673

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionAnupa Mukundram Mehta 

     Journal Clubs at the unit or organization level are a great way to share information on EBP. In a journal club, a group of nurses would meet regularly to discuss a study related to EBP, critically evaluate the study, discuss its implications for practice, and identify areas for further research (Almomami et al., 2019). Two barriers are that it can be hard to find a group of nurses who are interested in this topic and are able to meet regularly. It might also be hard to find articles that are relevant and will generate meaningful discussion. Despite this, it is still worth it to have a journal club, as those who are interested will attend, and can encourage others to attend. If everyone works together and searches multiple databases, it should be possible to find relevant articles.

    A podium presentation at an organizational conference is another great way to disseminate information on EBP. At these events, nurses can learn from experts in their field and network with others (Adams, 2019). Bringing this information back to your home hospital can help many more nurses than just yourself as well. Two barriers are they can be expensive to attend, and they are difficult to schedule logistically which can make it difficult to have them regularly (Adams, 2019). My hospital alleviates this by deciding how many nurses they will financially support to attend a particular conference. Joining the committee of the organization can help you be a part of making the conference happen more often.

    One strategy I would be least inclined to use a single one-way form of communication, such as a brochure or newsletter, as it is easily overlooked and does not provide the opportunity to ask questions or provide feedback. It is also hard to measure the impact of this strategy on practice (Lee et al., 2021).

    Another strategy I would not use is a single event such as a single lecture or presentation, as it does not allow for engagement or follow-up and does not give the opportunity to discuss information or ask questions. It may also not reach a large enough audience to have an impact.

     

     

     

     

    References:

    Adams S. (2009) Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference. The Journal of School Nursing. 2009;25(4):302-313. doi:10.1177/1059840509335008Links to an external site.

     

    Almomani, E., Alraoush, T., Sadah, O., Al Nsour, A., Kamble, M., Samuel, J., Atallah, K., Zarie, K., & Mustafa, E. (2019). Journal club as a tool to facilitate evidence based practice in critical care. Qatar Medical Journal2019(2), 85. https://doi.org/10.5339/qmj.2019.qccc.85Links to an external site.

     

    Lee, C., Sparschu, D., Parker, B., Poat, C., & Smith, G. (2021). Implementation of Pre-operative Surgical Instructional Brochure Utilizing ERAS, Research, and Evidenced Based Perianesthesia Practice. Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing, 2021(4), 36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jopan.2021.06.013

     Reply to Comment

      • Collapse SubdiscussionAnupa Mukundram Mehta 

        As an APN, I will have knowledge of how to find the best evidence to inform clinical practice by using literature reviews and analyzing data. I can identify areas in my organization that need evidence-based interventions, and start educating members of my team about how to apply this evidence. Effectively disseminating the information is important because that is how the members of my team will feel the desire to adopt the changes. It will ensure the dissemination is done consistently and correctly and may encourage a culture of EBP where we continuously learn and make improvements that will better patient outcomes.

         Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionStephen Chege 

      Response 1
      Great post, Anupa.
      I enjoyed reading your post. Evidenced Based Practice is critical to providing quality care. Melnyk et al. (2017) appraise the use of EBP to improve the quality of care, and the nurses feel empowered in completing the tasks assigned.
      Having journal meetings can yield positive results and allow the staff to discuss the perception regarding EBP. It is possible to encounter some barriers to the implementation of EBP. EBP barriers include workplace culture and knowledge and skills deficit regarding EBP. It is difficult to find journal articles tailored to the challenges specific to the unit.

      A podium presentation is good to reaching out to the organizational members, especially for the universal care model. Also, the leadership can encourage the staff members to attend educational seminars related to EBP.
      Ford et al. (2011) mention strategies to engage staff to endorse EBP, including understanding the interest of the staff, effective communication to the staff regarding EBP, explaining the project at hand, and providing essential reading materials necessary to understand the project.
      References
      Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Choy, K. (2017). A test of the ARCC© model improves the implementation of evidence-based practice, healthcare culture, and patient outcomes Links to an external site. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 14(1), 5–9. doi:10.1111/wvn.12188
      Gallagher-Ford, L., Fineout-Overhold, E., Melnyk, B.M. &  Stillwell, S.B. (2011). Evidence-based practice step-by-step:
      Implementing an evidence-based practice change Links to an external site. American Journal of Nursing, 111(3), 54-60.

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionUrsla Anyizi-Taku 

      Second Response

      Hi Anupa,

      Your post is exciting. Effective dissemination ensures not only the efficient distribution of new knowledge, but it raises awareness and encourages collaboration. It is imperative to ensure visibility of a project by promoting it and the activities within it (Wilson, et al. 2010Links to an external site.). When devising a dissemination strategy, there are several points to consider. Having a clear goal and identifying the audience and their needs means to avoid unnecessary improvisation. Once the audience is defined, the message and channels of communication are the next step. Resources, a timetable and evaluation are key. The process of powerful dissemination is definitely very complex. Well-designed dissemination strategies can improve access to a guideline and lead to improvement in health outcomes (Flodgren, et al. 2016Links to an external site.). Good dissemination and communication need to be a carefully planned process that involves considering the target audience, the message must get across and the communication strategies that will help to achieve this goal. Another important and necessary consideration is the political context and any potential impact on the government; a key stakeholder by a possible counter-campaign if the guidelines address a sensitive health issue.

      Reference

      Flodgren, G., A. M. Hall, et al. (2016). Tools developed and disseminated by guideline producers to promote the uptake of their guidelines. Cochrane Database Syst Rev(8): CD010669.Links to an external site.

      Wilson, P. M., M. Petticrew, et al. (2010). Disseminating research findings: what should researchers do? A systematic scoping review of conceptual frameworks. Implement Sci 5: 91.Links to an external site.

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionDiana Boreland-Warden 

      Good morning Anupa ,

       

      I enjoyed reading your post. I agree that journal clubs and unit-based organizations are a great way to disseminate information. This is one of the most effective ways to communicate the needs of the organization on a unit level. One of the current organizations that I work for uses this technique to communicate all aspects of delivery of care and potential ways that the staff can advocate or become more involved. Some opportunities even offer and advertise CEU’s. A large body of evidence supports the importance of journal clubs as a method to improve patient outcome by enhancing the implementation of evidence-based practice and professional development in the clinical setting (Almomani et al., 2019).

       

      Dissemination of information via brochures and meeting with the teams allow the opportunity to increase professionalism while empowering the staff with knowledge. This also allows team members to enhance professional skills and behaviors such as collaboration, communication, leadership, self-efficacy, decision making, role responsibility and situational awareness to ensure team functioning for safe patient care  (Lee et al., 2021).

       

      References

      Almomani, E., Alraoush, T., Sadah, O., Al Nsour, A., Kamble, M., Samuel, J., Atallah, K., Zarie, K., & Mustafa, E. (2019). Journal club as a tool to facilitate evidence based practice in critical care. Qatar Medical Journal2019(2), 85

       

      Lee, C., Sparschu, D., Parker, B., Poat, C., & Smith, G. (2021). Implementation of Pre-operative Surgical Instructional Brochure Utilizing ERAS, Research, and Evidenced Based Perianesthesia Practice. Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing, 2021(4), 36.

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionStephen Chege 

    Main Discussion Post

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is critical to promoting patient-quality care provision. It is, therefore, essential for healthcare organizations to establish and implement the strategies that promote EBP. Ehrenbrusthoff et al. (2022) mention that adhering to EBP improves the quality of care and safety of the patients and supports clinicians in providing quality care.

    Dissemination Strategies Most Inclined

    My organization’s effective strategy to disseminate EBP would be unit-level and poster presentations. In my organization, different units have patients admitted with varying care needs. Some units include Huntington’s disease unit, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)/Neuro rehab, Substance abuse/Infectious diseases, and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) unit. Considering the variable care needs specific to these units, it is vital to tailor the care provided to best fit the population in each unit. Some factors or levels of care may be universal and applicable to all departments. Using poster presentations specific to the unit needs can work in my organization.

    Also, a unit-based presentation can effectively disseminate EBP in my organization. Engaging with the staff and clinicians within the unit level will help focus on clinical matters specific to the clientele in that unit. The front-line clinicians can tailor presentations to touch on real clinical challenges at the unit level, establish measurable goals, and compare the results after implementing EBP. Coleman et al. (2020) support that utilizing web-based training and data analysis can help reach out to many clinicians and reflect objective data supporting the effectiveness of EBP.

    Dissemination Strategies Least Inclined

    Podium presentation at the organizational level can be effective in disseminating EBP. However, it may offer a poor platform to discuss the specific matters affecting different units in my organization due to variations in the level of care and patients’ needs.

    The use of journal articles may contain important information; however, clinicians may need more time to read and synthesize the information featured in the report.

    Possible Barriers When Using the Dissemination Strategies

    Implementing and sustaining EBP can be challenging, and it faces barriers that hinder evidenced based care provision. Melnyk et al. (2017) highlight several barriers that include knowledge and skills deficits for clinicians regarding EBP, poor perception of EBP, culture, and politics within healthcare organizations that do not endorse EBP, and limited resources and support from the leadership and the organization management. For example, in my organization, double documentation is encountered in many levels of care, despite the existence of electronic medication administration records (eMAR). The providers enter most orders in computerized provider order entry (CPOE); however, medications like Warfarin, insulin, and Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) get entered in paper orders. Combining paper orders and CPOE increases the probability of missing paper orders or medical errors.

    Strategies to Overcome Barriers

    One strategy to overcome barriers to EBP is recruiting front-line clinicians to champion the endorsement of EBP within the organizations. The front-line clinicians would engage with EBP and create a model that signifies measurable outcomes from evidence-based care. The front-line clinicians would also receive adequate training and work on breaking the old culture and politics that hinder the endorsement of EBP. For example, the front-line clinicians would take a case that impacts care within the organization, sample care provision using EBP, and work on reflecting the care variations when EBP is endorsed.

    Implementing EBP also requires adequate resources within the organization. The clinicians patrolling the use of EBP should also engage the leadership and the management to discuss the importance of providing evidence-based care. The EBP champions should outline the objectives and establish measurable goals to help the administration understand the importance of EBP within the organization.

    References

    Coleman, J. L., Marceau, L., Zincavage, R., Magnavita, A. M., Ambrosoli, J., Shi, L., Simon, E., Ortigo, K., Clarke-Walper, K., Penix, E., Wilk, J., Ruzek, J. I., & Rosen, R. C. (2020). Understanding How Clinicians Use a New Web-based Tool for Disseminating Evidence-Based Practices for the Treatment of PTSD: The PTSD Clinicians Exchange. Military Medicine, 185(Suppl 1), 286–295. https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usz313Links to an external site.

    Ehrenbrusthoff, K., Braun, T., Bahns, C., Happe, L., & Kopkow, C. (2022). Adherence to evidence-based practice across healthcare professionals in Germany: results from a cross-sectional, nationwide survey. BMC Health Services Research, 22(1), 1285. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-022-08682-z

    Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Choy, K. (2017). A test of the ARCC© model improves implementation of evidence-based practice, healthcare culture, and patient outcomes Links to an external site.. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 14(1), 5–9. doi:10.1111/wvn. 12188

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionEsther Davis 

      Hi Steven,

      Great post. I read many articles that support dissemination through poster presentation, and I recommend the use of posters in the unit or within the organization. Although, I agree with you that “it may offer a poor platform to discuss the specific matters… due to variations in the level of care and patients’ needs”. According to Beckett & Powell, (2021), standardized poster templates do not feature the key steps of the methods used for EBP projects, so clinical and scholarly EBP poster template should be used which reflect the steps and terminology of EBP (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2019).

      When presenting posters, they should attract and engage the audience with visual appeal, color, organization, and layout as well as key content to demonstrate your expertise on the EBP initiative (Beckett & Powell,2021). Posters should be made legible and displayed in the common areas in the unit/organization. Patients and families may also benefit from posters, it can be used in educating them too.

      You made mention of podium presentations. I believe podium presentations at any level are also efficient dissemination methods for EBPs. They help introduce the practice to the audience, describe what they do, and their efficacy to live audiences. Here, questions and concerns from live audiences can be addressed. Questions from the audience also help to  keep the record straight on the practices, which helps make them more efficient. When addressed at local, regional, state, and national levels, they contribute to solving challenges the developers might find at varying levels (Melnyk, 2012). Communication of the EBPs is essential, and this tool serve as a great way of communicating practices.

       

                                                References

      Beckett, C.D., & Powell, J. (2021). Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practice Projects: Key  Strategies for Successful Poster Presentations. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 18(3), 158-160. https://doi.org/10.1111/wvn.12502

      Gallagher-Ford, L., Fineout-Overholt, E., Melnyk, B. M., & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-based practice, step by step: implementing an evidence-based practice change. AJN The American Journal of Nursing, 111(3), 54-60.

      Melnyk, B. M. (2012). Achieving a high-reliability organization through implementation of the ARCC model for systemwide sustainability of evidence-based practice. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 36(2), 127-135.

      Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (Eds.). (2019). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

       

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionAndrea M Allen 

      Hi Steven,

      Great read.  I Support your argument on strategies to overcome barriers.  I work for a Hospital for Mental Health in the county where I live.  I am flooded with ideas for improving the hospital.  The patients are well cared for however, there is so much more that is lacking but due to the lack of support by administration, improvements are not made fast enough.  The issue of finances, limited resources, and the culture of the institute makes it a proven challenge.  When nurses further their education they usually leave due to lack of support throughout their studies as well as frustration from trying to get the administrative staff onboard with what other hospitals are doing.  The hospital administrators do not have any nursing background and therefore nurses are not supported as such.  For the benefit of the patients, my intention is to use EBP presentation from a podium to try and get my point across with the help of the education department and a few colleagues.  The goal is to increase their knowledge which may open the door to future presentations on the issues at hand.

      Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Choy, K. (2017). A test of the ARCC© model improves implementation of evidence-based practice, healthcare culture, and patient outcomes Links to an external site.. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 14(1), 5–9. doi:10.1111/wvn. 12188

       

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionUrsla Anyizi-Taku 

      First Response

      Hello Stephen,

      I agree with you that to have evidence-based practice, there is a need for evidence. And with knowledge and hands-on experience, nurses can theorize, hypothesize, structure studies, and collect evidence that leads to better care. (Melnyk and Fineout, 2019). Nursing research aims to achieve better care standards and applications for patients and families. Knowledge sharing is the process of transferring undocumented and documented information from one person to another. In an organization, sharing knowledge increases productivity and empowers employees to do their jobs effectively and efficiently. Employees can work faster and smarter by getting easy access to insights, resources, and expertise. I intend to gather research to share with leaders in my organization in several ways. One of the most effective ways an organization can unlock the benefits of knowledge sharing is when they embed it within your culture. This leads to people only sharing knowledge with their closest colleagues (CCL). Knowledge sharing reduces repeated mistakes, helping employees make more informed decisions and increasing productivity. All of this helps employees flourish.Links to an external site.  Create spaces for knowledge sharing. The most effective knowledge-sharing platforms are real-time, automated, and capable of retaining relevant knowledge while forgetting no longer important data. An AI-powered knowledge platform ensures your employees can easily access and share knowledge in one centralized place.

      Reference

      Center for creative leadership How to Evaluate Leadership Development Impacts | CCLLinks to an external site. retrieved January, 25th 2023,

      Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (Eds.). (2019). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionNtumba Kabongo 

    MAIN POST

    Introduction

    The essential of evidence-based practice is to identify best practices by critically appraising research evidence and applying it to clinical practice. It is a systematic approach to problem-solving that requires synthesizing the best available evidence with clinical expertise and patient preferences to make decisions.

     Discussion

    One strategy is to present the results through a unit-level or organizational-level presentation (Newhouse et al., 2007). Thus, EBP practitioners can provide an overview of the findings and explain the application of the evidence in practice. The presentation may include discussing the research methods, the results obtained, and the implications for practice. Another strategy is to submit posters or podium presentations at organizational, local, regional, state, and national levels (Melnyk et al., 2011). Thus, the EBP practitioner can visually represent the findings and provide a more in-depth explanation of the evidence and its application.

    A third strategy is to publish the findings in peer-reviewed journals. Thus, the EBP practitioner can reach a broad audience and provide the research evidence to a larger audience. This strategy allows other researchers to review the findings and provide feedback (Melnyk et al., 2017).

    Finally, the EBP practitioner can use social media to disseminate the evidence. Through this, the practitioner can reach a broad audience and provide a link to the research evidence. Social media also offers the opportunity to engage in discussion and to share resources related to the evidence (Melnyk et al., 2012).

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, various strategies for disseminating EBP within an organization, community, or industry exist. Each strategy provides a different platform for the EBP practitioner to reach a broad audience and share the research evidence. They select the strategy that best fits the audience and the research goals.

     

    References

    Melnyk, B. M. (2012). Achieving a high-reliability organization through implementation of the ARCC model for systemwide sustainability of evidence-based practice. Links to an external site. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 36(2), 127–135. Doi: 10.1097/NAQ.0b013e318249fb6a

    Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Gallagher-Ford, L., & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-based practice, step by step: Sustaining evidence-based practice through organizational policies and an innovative model. Links to an external site. American Journal of Nursing, 111(9), 57–60. Doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000405063.97774.0e

    Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Choy, K. (2017). A test of the ARCC© model improves implementation of evidence-based practice, healthcare culture, and patient outcomes Links to an external site. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 14(1), 5–9. doi:10.1111/wvn.12188

    Newhouse, R. P., Dearholt, S., Poe, S., Pugh, L. C., & White, K. M. (2007). Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice Links to an external site. Journal of Nursing Administration, 37(12), 552–557. Doi: 0.1097/01.NNA.0000302384.91366.8

     

     Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionAndrea M Allen 

    Module 5 Discussion

    Strategies for effective communication of EBP includes the use of Publishing program or policy briefs, publishing project findings in national journals and statewide publications, presenting at national conferences and meetings of professional associations or presenting program results to local community groups and other local stakeholders by way of Podium Presentations Using Power Point presentation and , creating and distributing program materials,  such as flyers, guides, pamphlets, or  sharing information through social media or on an organization’s website, to name a few.  While all are effective for certain targeted audiences, the most common and effective strategies of disseminating widely cited EBP I believe, is using Academic Journals and Conferences and Podium Presentations with Power point as well as social media.

     

    It is through effective dissemination strategies that acquired knowledge is shared, redundancies in problem solving eliminated, and further innovations are inspired (Williams, 2016).  My selection for these effective strategies is due in part to disseminating research in journals that are geared to clinicians is essential to increase nurses’ awareness of research findings that might be relevant to the practice.  Articles in clinical journals for example disseminate not only information about clinical practice, but also informed readers about research of potential value to the nurse’s practice.  Power point presentation helps the audience to remember information for a long time and can enhance the intellect of the audience.  It supports speech, visualize a complicated concept, and share research findings with a large audience. Social media is a powerful communication median with widespread influences over cities as well as remote areas, providing access to the ill-informed person who does not have the means to education, journals or publications know how.

     

    I would least be inclined to creating and distributing program materials (fliers, guides, pamphlets).  My reason is even though they are cost effective, may have a lot of information, easy to read, and targets specific demographics, there is the risk that people may accept them because they felt pressured and not because they are interested in the information. If the leaflets are especially made of poor quality, they would be easily discarded.  Visually if the pamphlet is appealing, only then will it be opened by the target audience.

     

     

    Barriers to disseminating information by journals and publications can be organizational and includes hindering of a team’s effort by poor leadership, change-averse culture, insufficient collegiate support and bureaucratic constraints via logistical/methodological, financial systems and regulatory issues. Ways in which to overcome these barriers.  Overcoming these barriers can be achieved by adopting a EBP model, asking the right questions, critically appraise the evidence and integrate evidence with clinicians and patients.

     

     

     

    References

     

     

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.

     

    Williams, J., Cullen, L. (2016). Evidence into Practice: Disseminating an evidence-Based Practice Project as a Poster. Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing. Vol.31 (5). 440-444 DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jopan.2016.07.002

    Scullion, P. (2002). Effective Dissemination Strategies. ProQuest. Vol. 10, (1). 65-67.

    Oermann, M., Nordstrom, C., Wilmes, D., […] & Kowalewski, K. (2007). Disssemination of Research in clinical nursing journals. Journal of Clinical Nursing. Vol. 17 (2). 149-156 https://doi/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.01975.x

     

     

     

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  • Collapse SubdiscussionSulaiman Yassin Jalloh 

    Developing A Culture Of Evidence-Based PracticeDissemination of research findings is valuable in fostering an evidence-based culture in clinical settings. There are multiple dissemination strategies that are available for nurse practitioners when they partake in EBP projects. Nurse leaders must identify and apply the dissemination that meets the organizational needs.

    Dissemination Strategies Most Inclined to Use

    The most favored dissemination strategies are unit-level meetings and oral podium Presentations. Unit-level meetings allow the nurse leader to present the evidence to the specific audience that is involved in the adoption of change (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2022). Among the benefits of the unit-level meetings include the chance for nurses to enquire about any unclear information. Podium presentations incorporate the application of visual and published elements when sharing the evidence (Chapman et al., 2020). Similar to the unit-level meetings, the presentations allow the audience to engage with the nurse leader and ask questions to provide further clarity on the recommended practice (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2022). Both PowerPoint presentations and unit-level meetings could be combined for effective evidence dissemination.

    Dissemination Strategies Least Inclined to Use

    The least favorite dissemination strategies are podcasts and the publication of evidence in peer-reviewed journals. Podcasts are disadvantageous because of limited audience and accessibility issues. Also, the process of developing a podcast is time-consuming (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2022). Publishing the evidence in a peer-reviewed journal is a laborious and time-consuming process because the nurse practitioner must develop a manuscript and present it for review (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2022). Thus, the strategies are not ideal for evidence dissemination in organizational settings.

    Barriers to Evidence Dissemination

    There are various barriers to the effective use of organizational meetings and oral podium presentations in evidence dissemination. One of the obstacles is poor language, which leads to the failure to communicate the message (Jolley, 2020). An example of poor language skills is the use of jargon. The second obstacle is time constraints. With the busy work schedule, the nurse leader may struggle to find an appropriate time when all staff members are available for the presentations (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2022). Addressing the obstacles is instrumental for the effective adoption of new evidence into the organization’s culture.

     

    References

    Chapman, E., Haby, M. M., Toma, T. S., De Bortoli, M. C., Illanes, E., Oliveros, M. J., & Barreto, J. O. M. (2020). Knowledge translation strategies for dissemination with a focus on healthcare recipients: an overview of systematic reviews. Implementation Science15(1), 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-020-0974-3

    Jolley, J. (2020). Introducing research and evidence-based practice for nursing and healthcare professionals. Routledge.

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2022). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionMleh Porter 

      Hello Sulaiman,

      Thank you for your post. I agree that dissemination is an integral part of the translation of evidence because if the translation is not disseminated, then no change in care will occur because the new methods will not be adopted (Curtis et al., 2017).  Unit-level meetings and oral podiums are effective ways to disseminate evidence. However, you also mention ineffective communication, such as jargon and time constraints due to tight schedules, as barriers to oral podiums and unit-level meetings. To overcome these barriers and improve the effectiveness of an oral podium, one must consider the target audience and the message being passed across when choosing communication strategies. When information is being communicated to healthcare professionals, medical terminology could be utilized without any issues, but it may be a problem when communicating with patients. Multiple days of unit-level meetings on different shifts will help address the time constraint. In addition, to the in-person unit meetings, meetings could be held online to allow for flexibility and increase attendance. Well-designed dissemination strategies increase evidence access, leading to improved patient health outcomes (Flodgren et al., 2016).

      References

      Curtis, K., Fry, M., Shaban, R. Z., & Considine, J. (2017). Translating research findings to clinical nursing practice. Journal of Clinical Nursing26(5-6), 862–872. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.13586Links to an external site.

      Flodgren, G., Hall, A. M., Goulding, L., Eccles, M. P., Grimshaw, J. M., Leng, G. C., & Shepperd, S. (2016). Tools developed and disseminated by guideline producers to promote the uptake of their guidelines. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.cd010669.pub2

       

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  • Collapse SubdiscussionOdion Iseki 

    The evidence-based practice focuses on aspects contributing to a highly integrated environment where improved outcomes are achievable. The evidence-based approach focuses on a particular issue for which the findings may be compared to past results. Dissemination of findings from evidence-based practice can be evaluated depending on a variety of contexts, primarily where the course will be implemented. Evidence-based practice (EBP) demands practitioners to consistently offer evidence to support their decision-making and policy/practice changes. Healthcare professionals can use the EBP model to begin and implement policy changes that will improve patient care. During the process, practitioners must plea to lawmakers with facts demonstrating why the proposed modifications should be implemented. Several methods exist for spreading the evidence. Dissemination is defined by Melnyk and Fineout-Overholt (2018) as “the process of widely sharing or circulating information” (p. 752).

    TWO DISSEMINATION STRATEGIES THAT I WOULD BE MOST INCLINED TO USE

    A unit-level presentation and local dissemination are the most effective tactics (Harvey & Kitson, 2015). Unit-level distribution is only successful if the issue considered contributes to improving the underlying problem inside the unit. Different units within a given context may evaluate the operational environment differently. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the context in which the evidence-based approach is implemented. Thus, ensuring that the engagement is strategic contributes to implementing a unit-based intervention based on the outcomes (Brownson et al., 2018). Organizations attempt to apply crucial areas of performance enhancement. Nevertheless, the evidence-based approach removed the uncertainty risk, essential for achieving improved outcomes.

    Local distribution comprises critical local actors, a positive characteristic that helps place a heavy emphasis on institutional development (Hall & Roussel, 2016). However, it is necessary to guarantee that the dissemination of results occurs in an environment with the resources and technological know-how to achieve superior outcomes. The population’s skills and knowledge are likely to impede the successful implementation of the suggested practice. Existing stakeholders’ requirements must be managed, which is crucial and will aid organizational planning and service delivery. Adopting evidence-based practice should emphasize creating an environment where positive change is more easily implemented. Therefore, training is essential to provide stakeholders with the skills necessary to execute evidence-based practice (Brownson et al., 2018).

    LEAST INCLINED DISSEMINATION STRATEGIES TO BE USED

    Poster and podium presentations are the least likely dissemination tactics to be employed while disseminating EBP. The poster presentations need to provide more information and appear engaging and intriguing, defeating the purpose of the presentation. On the other hand, the presentation from the podium may experience a low turnout. Poor promotion of the presentation could result in low attendance.

    BARRIERS TO BE ENCOUNTERED AND OVERCOMING THESE BARRIERS

    The lack of interest on the part of the employees could be an obstacle to the unit-level presentation. An example is a staff member’s opposition to a change they dislike or do not desire. Staff participation in the exhibition is one method for overcoming this obstacle. For example, make a staff employee one of the presenters at the presentation. This will increase their audience’s interest in the production. Lack of access to peer-reviewed publications is a potential obstacle to their utilization. One example is journals that need a subscription charge, discouraging many readers. This barrier can be overcome by granting online readers free access to these journals.

    References

    Brownson, R. C., Colditz, G. A., & Proctor, E. K. (Eds.). (2018). Dissemination and implementation research in health: translating science to practice. Oxford University Press.

    Hall, H. R., & Roussel, L. A. (Eds.). (2016). Evidence-based practice. Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

    Harvey, G., & Kitson, A. (2015). Implementing evidence-based practice in healthcare: a facilitation guide. Routledge.

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.

    • Chapter 10, “The Role of Outcomes on Evidence-based Quality Improvement and enhancing and Evaluating Practice Changes” (pp. 293–312)
    • Chapter 12, “Leadership Strategies for Creating and Sustaining Evidence-based Practice Organizations” (pp. 328–343)
    • Chapter 14, “Models to Guide Implementation and Sustainability of Evidence-based Practice” (pp. 378–427)

     

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  • Collapse SubdiscussionJasmine London 

    Dissemination is the intent to give out information and intervention materials to a specific target audience (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018).  The aim is to spread knowledge and the evidence based interventions on a larger scale. Dissemination strategies is essential to closing the research-practice gap in healthcare (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2017). Two dissemination strategies that I would be inclined to use is presenting research results at national conferences or at organizational meetings. Another way would be publishing findings on an organization’s website or distributing guides or pamphlets.

    Many organizational meetings are held annually to address various issues within healthcare system. These meetings are significant for developing policies and procedures. Presenting research results at organizational meeting would be a great way to showcase evidence and promote changes in healthcare (Chapman et al., 2020). It would be a way to directly address important healthcare issues with executives and directors. Sharing information through social media or on the organization’s website can be effective because many healthcare staff use social media and have access to their organizational website. It is more likely that the information will be viewed on online platforms (Chapman et al., 2020). The dissemination strategy that I would be least inclined to use is publishing information in newsletter or pamphlets. I feel like people would be more inclined to view information online than on paper. A pamphlet or newsletter does not provide a space for discussion or feedback whereas an online platform can. It can be easily overlooked or tossed aside.

    There are many barriers that might occur with these dissemination strategies. One barrier is that nurses lack the knowledge and skills to implement these strategies. Some people may not know how to approach social media effectively, also there is risk regarding online privacy. The information can become available to unintended audiences. Another barrier can be the timing of organizational meetings and nurses getting the opportunity to address their issues without it being postponed or pushed back.

     

    Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Choy, K. (2017). A test of the ARCC© model improves implementation of evidence-based practice, healthcare culture, and patient outcomes Links to an external site. Links to an external site.Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 14(1), 5–9. doi:10.1111/wvn.12188 

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    Chapman, E., Haby, M. M., Toma, T. S., de Bortoli, M. C., Illanes, E., Oliveros, M. J., & Barreto, J. O. M. (2020). Knowledge translation strategies for dissemination with a focus on healthcare recipients: an overview of systematic reviews. Implementation Science15(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-020-0974-3

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionVictavian Jackson 

      Great Post Jasmine London,

      I agree, the dissemination strategy I would be least likely to use is publishing information in newsletters or pamphlets. Most people is more likely to review articles and journals on an online platform over searching for a morning newspaper. The last two decades have given researchers millions of views by publishing scholarly journals and books online (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020, p.1). A newsletter or pamphlets cannot host a discussion forum and receive real-time feedback on various issues within the healthcare system. National conferences is a great way to showcase evidence-based research and improve healthcare but I prefer to disseminate evidence-based practice as a poster. A poster is essentially a method of visual communication that provides a highlight of pertinent project information (Williams & Cullen, 2016, p. 441). For example, during a hospital skills lab, I used a poster to identify and measure the amount of CAUTI occurring in the unit. The nurse’s gave great feedback on graphs and intervention that have helped prevent CAUTI’s.

      References

      Ross-Hellauer, T., Tennant, J. P., Banelytė, V., Gorogh, E., Luzi, D., Kraker, P., Pisacane, L., Ruggieri, R., Sifacaki, E., & Vignoli, M. (2020). Ten simple rules for innovative dissemination of research. PLOS Computational Biology16(4), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007704Links to an external site.

      Williams, J. L., & Cullen, L. (2016). Evidence into practice: disseminating an evidence-based practice project as a poster. Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing31(5), 440–444. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jopan.2016.07.002Links to an external site.

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionCheron Massonburg 

    The Agency for Health Care Research (AHRQ) defines dissemination as the targeted distribution of health information or practices to a specific public health or clinical practice audience to spread knowledge on the associated evidence-based practice (The Agency for Health Care Research, 2012). Nurses can achieve great results for their patients through evidence-based practice by sharing their experiences with colleagues and other health organizations. They can do this by conducting unit or organizational level presentations, podium, or poster presentations at local, regional, state, and national levels. As well as publications in peer-reviewed journals and professional newsletters.

    Publication in peer-reviewed journals is the most likely strategy I will use in the dissemination of evidence-based practice. One of the reasons for choosing peer-reviewed journals is the rigorous and detailed review it undergoes by fellow experts in that field of study before it is published. This is to ensure that the final information released to the targeted audience is accurate and valid. Furthermore, the world now is more digitized, with approximately 51.4% of people having online access globally as of 2019 (Johnson, 2021). The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has also played a part with most people depending on the internet for information, one only needs an email and password to access my publication from the internet Discussion: Developing a Culture of Evidence-Based Practice.

    The poster presentation is the other method I will use to disseminate evidence-based practice. The poster presentation is a type targeted, direct and precise communication strategy designed to reach more people at a particular time (Noar et al., 2009). For example, the world health organization has designed many posters to sensitize and educate the world on the dangers of coronavirus and how it can be prevented. This is advantageous to me because I can in turn design a poster on how to put on personal protective equipment and guide people on how to use and dispose of it after use. This can be achieved through social media platforms, such as Facebook, and mass media such as televisions and newspapers.

    Nevertheless, oral podium presentations and community outreaches although they are also effective, I may least use them because of the ongoing pandemic. This is because patients or concerned groups may fail to attend in fear of contracting the coronavirus and also due to the government restrictions in place on the movement of people and public gatherings. I may use webinars and zoom meetings to substitute oral presentations but also, they are hindered by technical issues such as internet connectivity and disconnect between the speaker and audience.

    Although these publications are ranked as the best and poster presentation as the third-best dissemination tool in Evidence-based practices (Walling, n.d, p.5), publication in peer-review has got its disadvantages. They include a lack of time to submit and pursue the publication process, considering that I am a nurse who has full-time duties at the hospital. Secondly, during this pandemic, it is hard to find a co-author to collaborate with and do research with considering the government restrictions in place. Lastly, it takes approximately four years to allow for adequate time for a publication to appear in the literature (Chapman & Bakkum, 2017), which is a long period and makes the timeliness of information a problem. To mitigate the above barriers, I will try to create more time to follow up on my publication. This can be made possible by delegating some of my duties to my colleagues.

    Poster presentation lacks flexibility, once published, a poster cannot be modified or edited. This calls for me as the maker to be keener and make sure that they are published to disseminate the evidence-based intervention they were intended for. Viewers also need to make an effort to take action compared to social media posts with links. This makes me enhance my reporting to elaborate on finer details of the poster for the audience to understand it (Gordon et al., 2013).

                                                                                              References

    Bakkum, B., & Chapman, C. (2017). Barriers to peer-reviewed journal article publication of abstracts presented at the 2006–2008 Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference and Research Agenda Conference Meetings. Journal Of Chiropractic Education31(1), 20-26. https://doi.org/10.7899/jce-14-21Links to an external site.

    Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence | Effective Health Care Program. Effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov. (2012). Retrieved 24 April 2021, from https://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/products/medical-evidence-Links to an external site.communication/research-protocol.

    Gordon, M., Darbyshire, D., Saifuddin, A., & Vimalesvaran, K. (2013). Limitations of poster presentations reporting educational innovations at a major international medical education conference. Medical Education Online18(1), 20498. https://doi.org/10.3402/meo.v18i0.20498 Discussion: Developing a Culture of Evidence-Based Practice

    Noar, S., Benac, C., & Hams, M. (2007). Does Tailoring Matter? Meta Analytical Review of Tailored Print  [Ebook] (p. 93) http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov.

     

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  • Collapse SubdiscussionChristiana Nuworsoo 

    Initial Post

    Dissemination is the act of communicating research findings to key stakeholders and a broader audience. The viability and sustainability of EBP research, in the long run, depending on the acceptance and application of research findings, both of which are dependent on dissemination (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, n.d.).  Depending on the format in which one decides to communicate information, whether unit-level or organizational-level presentations, poster presentations, and podium presentations at organizational, local, regional, state, and national levels, as well as publication in peer-review journals, requires sufficient preparation, and planning.  However, the success of every communication project is increased by effective preparation, which lowers performance anxiety and boosts confidence.

    Two dissemination strategies that I would be most inclined to use are unit-level or organizational-level presentations and podium presentations.  These two are my preferred type of communication because they both offer an opportunity to share information and learn knowledge (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018).  Learning comes from immediate feedback and questions push one to do more research to find the answers to questions he or she was unable to answer. I do not mind questions that I do not have immediate answers to, because should I get the opportunity to present the same information, the answers to questions will now be incorporated in the presentation moving forward.

    The dissemination strategy I’m least likely to use would be poster presentation because the information presented must be limited to only the most crucial details of a study or evidence-based project’s content.  Also, design is not my strongest attribute; a poster presentation must be visually appealing as well as have a captivating format of information.

    Two barriers that I might encounter when using a podium presentation is that there is usually a time limit of about 15 to 20 minutes (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018).  And as much as I like immediate feedback, the formality of the presentation and time might not be enough for questions and answers at the end.  Another barrier to podium presentation is the initial anxiety or fear of presenting to a room full of people.

    To overcome the time limit, I must follow my presentation without deviating from the information that I want to share.  I need to be clear, communicate one thing at a time, and use language that is understandable (NSW Health, 2020).  To overcome the anxiety and fear, I need to come prepared and on time.

     

     

     

     

    References

    Agency for Health Research and Quality. (n.d.). Quick-start guide to dissemination for practice-based research networks. Retrieved January 25, 2023 https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/wysiwyg/ncepcr/resources/dissemination-quick-start-guide.pdfLinks to an external site.

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.

    NSW Health. (2020). How can I overcome communication barriers? Retrieved January 25, 2023 https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/mentalhealth/psychosocial/strategies/Pages/communicating-barriers.aspxLinks to an external site.

     

     

     

     

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    • Collapse SubdiscussionEsther Davis 

      Hello Christiana,

      Great post. Dissemination is how best to communicate and integrate knowledge and the associated evidence-based interventions (EBI) to targeted public health and clinical practice audiences, to maximize the reach of EBIs (Neta et al, 2021).

      Dissemination strategy is important in transmitting knowledge into care. The unit or organization or podium presentations are good dissemination strategies but depending on the audience.  If the audience is streamlined to the hospital unit or within the organization, I think it is beneficial. I like the Podium presentations because it allows for visual representation of the study findings, and it provides a more in-depth explanation of the evidence and its application. It also gives the audience opportunity to answer questions.

      Peers review journals is a good strategy but other than sufficient preparation and planning that you mentioned as a shortcoming, one benefit is that journals are more accessible to a bigger audience than it was previously. Dissemination strategies is important in closing the  research-practice gap in healthcare (Melnyk et al., 2017). When researchers publish their findings in peer-reviewed publications, other professionals in the field have the opportunity to undertake their own examination of the study’s findings.

       

      References

      Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Choy, K. (2017). A test of the ARCC© model improves implementation of evidence-based practice, healthcare culture, and patient outcomes . Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 14(1), 5–9. https://doi:10.1111/wvn.12188

      Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

      Neta, G., Clyne, M., & Chambers, D. A. (2021). Dissemination and Implementation Research at the National Cancer Institute: A Review of Funded Studies (2006–2019) and Opportunities to Advance the Field. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prevention, 30 (2), 260–267. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-0795Links to an external site.

       

       

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  • Collapse SubdiscussionMona Bourbour Shirazi Kordi 

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a key point to providing better safety and outcomes for patients. EBP make the opportunity to clinicians to enhance their practice quality which affects patients’ quality of care. Nursing staffs who do evidence-based practices are able to make positive changes in the quality of care for their patients (Melnyk, 2017).

    The first dissemination that I would like to use in the healthcare system, is the publication of a systematic review for the patients. It has focused on advancing healthcare decisions between patients and their healthcare providers. A systematic review is a good way of communication to discuss patients’ options and involves patients’ decisions in their treatments. In fact, healthcare providers can communicate with patients in different ways to enhance the chance of understanding the plan of care for the audience.

    Another dissemination strategy that I like to utilize is podium presentations in healthcare organizations. These organizational-level presentations will let professionals present their achievements in the facility. It is also helpful to get different ideas and recommendations at the evidence level based which saves time for other target audiences (Melnyk, 2018, chp.16)

    Another dissemination strategy that is my least inclined is peer-reviewed in public. The reason behind this is the ranking from the John Hopkins quality guide that allocates the lowest ranking “level V’’. The peer-reviewed includes many limitations such as having not enough knowledge and education of the clinicians. It will be also time-consuming which gets a lot of energy and is not always properly supported by the staff nurses who are having heavy duties. Healthcare providers who are involved do also not support the peer-reviewed very well which leads to a lack of resources and investments in EBP (Melnyk, 2017). In order to overcome these barriers, healthcare professionals and providers should obtain the necessary knowledge to implement evidence-based practices. They need to be supported by the organizations to improve the culture of evidence-based practices (Melnyk, 2017).

     

    References

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (4th ed.).

    Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Choy, K. (2017). A test of the ARCC model improves the implementation of evidence-based practice, healthcare culture, and patient outcomes. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 14(1), 5-9

    Newhouse, R. P., Dearholt, S., Poe, S., Pugh, L. C., & White, K. M. (2007). Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice Links to an external site. Links to an external site.Journal of Nursing Administration, 37(12), 552–557. doi:0.1097/01.NNA.0000302384.91366.8f 

     

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    • Collapse SubdiscussionJimmy Jesse Ortega 

      Mona,

      I enjoyed reading your post this week! I too chose a dissemination strategy that was aimed at informing the patients and not just other healthcare providers. The strategy of publishing systematic reviews for patients is a good one. One strategy that I would utilize in my practice would be to create a lay version of the original recommendations. A lay version enables patients to better understand the goals of treatment, the different treatment options, and the benefits and risks of each option (Schipper et al., 2016). As healthcare professionals, we sometimes forget that our patients do not understand complex medical terms. So it is important that we use terminology they will understand. Dissemination remains a responsibility of investigators despite unexpected or negative research findings because such research can generate new knowledge, stimulate further research, and advance the search for solutions to significant health problems (Derman & Jaeger, 2018).

       

      References

      Derman, R. J., & Jaeger, F. J. (2018). Overcoming challenges to dissemination and implementation of research findings in under-resourced countries. Reproductive health15(Suppl 1), 86. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12978-018-0538-z

      Schipper, K., Bakker, M., De Wit, M., Ket, J. C., & Abma, T. A. (2016). Strategies for disseminating recommendations or guidelines to patients: a systematic review. Implementation science : IS11(1), 82. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-016-0447-xLinks to an external site.

       

       

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  • Collapse SubdiscussionJimmy Jesse Ortega 

    Becoming more experienced with evidenced based practice is a skill that is beneficial to healthcare workers, but how to disseminate that information is also important to know. In health care many guidelines and recommendations for the management of diseases are developed. These recommendations are primarily developed to inform health professionals to improve daily routines of medicine (Schipper et al., 2016). Dissemination of this information can improve healthcare. One strategy that I would utilize in my practice would be to create a lay version of the original recommendations. A lay version enables patients to better understand the goals of treatment, the different treatment options, and the benefits and risks of each option (Schipper et al., 2016). Another strategy I would utilize would be using leaflets and brochures to communicate the information to the patients. Having something that can be physically held and read also helps to ensure the patients understands the information being presented to them. One dissemination strategy that I would avoid, would be to supply a patient with information using scientific and medical terminology that they may not understand. When this is done, misinformation can be spread from patient to others because they did not fully understand what was being told to them. Strategies for integration of research into practice can be complex; thus, it is beneficial to engage methodological support from the outset, to build necessary training requirements into stages of the implementation process, and to create research and service partnerships early (Derman & Jaeger, 2018). There are also some barriers when it comes to dissemination that must be overcome. As with virtually all areas of life, research dissemination has been disrupted by the internet and digitally networked technologies. The last two decades have seen the majority of scholarly journals move online, and scholarly books are increasingly found online as well as in print (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020). Dissemination remains a responsibility of investigators despite unexpected or negative research findings because such research can generate new knowledge, stimulate further research, and advance the search for solutions to significant health problems (Derman & Jaeger, 2018).

    References

    Derman, R. J., & Jaeger, F. J. (2018). Overcoming challenges to dissemination and implementation of research findings in under-resourced countries. Reproductive health15(Suppl 1), 86. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12978-018-0538-zLinks to an external site.

    Ross-Hellauer, T., Tennant, J. P., Banelytė, V., Gorogh, E., Luzi, D., Kraker, P., Pisacane, L., Ruggieri, R., Sifacaki, E., & Vignoli, M. (2020). Ten simple rules for innovative dissemination of research. PLoS computational biology16(4), e1007704. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007704Links to an external site.

    Schipper, K., Bakker, M., De Wit, M., Ket, J. C., & Abma, T. A. (2016). Strategies for disseminating recommendations or guidelines to patients: a systematic review. Implementation science : IS11(1), 82. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-016-0447-xLinks to an external site.

     

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    • Collapse SubdiscussionMellissa Rodriguez 

      Jimmy,

      great post this week, very informative! You mentioned that creating a lay version of original medical information would be beneficial to patients and I agree! We are so accustomed to medical terminology that we forget not all patients understand what some of these words mean. Providing information to them in terms they can understand is crucial. You also mentioned that the internet can potentially become a barrier in dissemination, and I can see how misinformation can be spread through websites that are not accredited. “Barriers to EBP must be removed or mitigated and facilitators put in place in order for individuals and health care systems to implement EBP as a standard of care”, and we as nurses can facilitate that process (Melnyk et al., 2011).

      One way to bypass this barrier is to ensure that we educate patients on getting information directly from their providers or websites that are credible. “Using guidelines to inform practice improves the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare while reducing inappropriate variations in practice” (Medves et al., 2010). If we as nurses, are consistent with our dissemination strategies with our patients then we can make a long-lasting impact.

      References

      Medves, J., Godfrey, C., Turner, C., Paterson, M., Harrison, M., MacKenzie, L., & Durando, P. (2010). Systematic review of practice guideline dissemination and implementation strategies for healthcare teams and team-based practice. International journal of evidence-based healthcare8(2), 79–89. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-1609.2010.00166.x Links to an external site.Links to an external site.

      Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Gallagher-Ford, L., & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-based practice, step by step: Sustaining evidence-based practice through organizational policies and an innovative model. Links to an external site.Links to an external site.American Journal of Nursing, 111(9), 57–60. doi:10.1097/01.NAJ.0000405063.97774.0e

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionBertina Boma Soh 

    Two Methods of Information Spreading That I Am Most Likely to Employ

     

    Two of the many methods that can be used to disseminate evidence-based practice (also known as EBP) are the ones I plan to utilize most frequently. Publication of evidence-based practice project findings in journals that have been subjected to peer review is one of these techniques that I am more likely to implement. This tactic is advantageous because information can be disseminated to several individuals (scholars) simultaneously at a low cost. The second tactic I am more likely to implement is to hold presentations on the results of EBP projects at either the corporate or the unit level. The EBP, its significance in expanding knowledge, and other pertinent aspects are all topics that will be covered in these presentations, which will be given to the healthcare providers working in each unit or organization (Harris et al., 2012). One of the primary reasons this is a good strategy that displays at the corporate or team level is suitable for many people working on disseminating EBP. Cost-effectiveness is another factor. Communicating the information to any organization’s employees is much simpler.

     

    The strategy of Dissemination That Is Least Likely to Be Used

     

    Providing presentations at national conferences and gatherings of professional organizations is the method of EBP dissemination I am least likely to employ in the future. The participation of patients in the whole process is one of the most important findings. These findings are relevant to develop, implementing, and evaluating more (effective) dissemination strategies that can improve health care (Cullen et al., 2022). In this strategy, I will participate in meetings and conferences on EBP that are hosted by healthcare professionals or designed for their benefit to exchange information and ideas. I will be least motivated to utilize this technique even though it has the potential to achieve better outcomes because it allows for better ideas and insights on EBP. Despite this, I won’t be using it because several hurdles will likely be encountered. For example, the first obstacle is that this strategy can be somewhat involved in the amount of time and money required. It is the amount of time and money needed for professionals to try to travel to and participate in conferences and meetings to acquire and share information regarding EBP. These meetings are typically held in a location apart from the professionals’ working areas. In addition to taking up a lot of time, the second obstacle is that a significant financial investment was necessary to organize and carry out these meetings. However, participating in virtual or online meetings makes it feasible to circumvent these limitations.

     

    References

    Harris, J. R., Cheadle, A., Hannon, P. A., Lichiello, P., Forehand, M., Mahoney, E., … & Yarrow, J. (2012). A framework for disseminating evidence-based health promotion practices. Preventing chronic disease9

    Cullen, Laura, et al. Evidence-based Practice in Action: Comprehensive Strategies, Tools, and Tips from University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics. Sigma Theta Tau, 2022.

     

     

     

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionJimmy Jesse Ortega 

      Bertina,

      Strategies for integration of research into practice can be complex; thus, it is beneficial to engage methodological support from the outset, to build necessary training requirements into stages of the implementation process, and to create research and service partnerships early (Derman & Jaeger, 2018). Although, dissemination is important to other healthcare professionals, it is also important that the information is disseminated to patients as well. In order for this to be done successfully I found the lay strategy to be the most beneficial. A lay version enables patients to better understand the goals of treatment, the different treatment options, and the benefits and risks of each option (Schipper et al., 2016). With better understanding comes a greater trust between patients and healthcare professionals.

      References

      Derman, R. J., & Jaeger, F. J. (2018). Overcoming challenges to dissemination and implementation of research findings in under-resourced countries. Reproductive health15(Suppl 1), 86. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12978-018-0538-zLinks to an external site.

      Schipper, K., Bakker, M., De Wit, M., Ket, J. C., & Abma, T. A. (2016). Strategies for disseminating recommendations or guidelines to patients: a systematic review. Implementation science : IS11(1), 82. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-016-0447-x

       

       

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionMona Bourbour Shirazi Kordi 

      Hi Bertina,

      I enjoyed reading your discussion post. The evidenced-based practices (EBP) you mentioned are very practical to utilize in a healthcare organization. Doing a presentation at the unit level will help to focus on the same unit while healthcare providers work in the same area (Harris et al., 2012).  It is easier for all the team members to have all of their presentations and communications in one place. However, being the focus in one unit is cost-effective and more staffs preference. I like the explanations and ideas about the time and money that needs to be invested in order to participate in different conferences for healthcare professionals. Evidence-based practices should help to decrease the cost and increase the quality of care. different organizations also can get the benefit of a variety of EBP methods due to their different setting and management (Cullen, Laura, et al. 2022).

      References

      Harris, J. R., Cheadle, A., Hannon, P. A., Lichiello, P., Forehand, M., Mahoney, E., … & Yarrow, J. (2012). A framework for disseminating evidence-based health promotion practices. Preventing chronic disease9

      Cullen, Laura, et al. Evidence-based Practice in Action: Comprehensive Strategies, Tools, and Tips from University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics. Sigma Theta Tau, 2022.

       

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionMleh Porter 

    Dissemination Strategies

    There are two dissemination strategies I prefer to use in my position as a nurse. One is providing educational materials to my audiences. Providing educational materials is an effective way to disseminate information to patients and other healthcare professionals, as it would enable me to provide information in a comprehensive and organized format. This strategy is arguably better than verbal communication as it would leave sufficient room and time for readers to review the material at their own pace and refer to it as needed. Two, utilizing social media for young and digital-savvy readers. Social media platforms are an excellent way to reach a wide audience with relative ease. According to Tanlaka et al. (2019), providing information on social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, reaches a wider and more diverse audience than I would be able to through more traditional methods, such as handouts and seminars. Considering the dissemination strategy, I would be least inclined to use providing seminars. While this method does allow for a larger audience to be reached, it also requires a significant amount of preparation and planning. Also, using a seminar strategy is difficult to ensure that the audience is engaged and understands the presented material. Given this, I prefer to use other methods that are more efficient and effective.

    Barriers

    Time would be a major challenge. I recognize that it takes time to create materials and posts that are informative and high in quality for audiences (Newhouse et al., 2007). It takes quite some time to create materials that are accurate and updated. Consideration must also be made of the fact that these materials are intended for a particular audience that may be difficult to reach (Ross-Hellauer et al., 2020).  Resources are the second major constraint these two strategies will likely face. Depending on the type of strategy selected, financial and technological constraints may emerge, making it difficult to create and distribute materials or posts. There may also be a lack of personnel or expertise available to effectively create the materials or posts. There are two strategies that I could use to overcome these two identified challenges. To overcome time constraints, I would create a plan for creating and distributing materials or posts. Doing this involves setting aside enough time to create the materials/posts and proofread them (Melnyk et al., 2011). I would use tools such as scheduling software that is available in digital formats online to assist me in managing my time and creating posts in advance. I will seek free or low-cost resources to help create and distribute materials and posts to overcome a lack of resources. I would further reach out to colleagues with relevant experience who can assist.

    References

    Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Gallagher-Ford, L., & Stillwell, S. B. (2011). Evidence-based practice, step by step: Sustaining evidence-based practice through organizational policies and an innovative model. AJN, American Journal of Nursing111(9), 57-60. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000405063.97774.0eLinks to an external site.

    Newhouse, R. P., Dearholt, S., Poe, S., Pugh, L. C., & White, K. M. (2007). Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration37(12), 552-557. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.NNA.0000302384.91366.8fLinks to an external site.

    Ross-Hellauer, T., Tennant, J. P., Banelytė, V., Gorogh, E., Luzi, D., Kraker, P., Pisacane, L., Ruggieri, R., Sifacaki, E., & Vignoli, M. (2020). Ten simple rules for innovative dissemination of research. PLOS Computational Biology16(4), e1007704. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007704

    Tanlaka, E. F., Ewashen, C., & King‐Shier, K. (2019). Postpositivist critical multiplism: Its value for nursing research. Nursing Open6(3), 740-744. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.17900Links to an external site.

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionAnupa Mukundram Mehta 

      Hi Mleh,

      It was great to see that you have been personally involved in dissemination strategies as a nurse. One strategy that I am less inclined to use is a single one-way form of communication, such as a brochure or newsletter, as it is easily overlooked and does not provide the opportunity to ask questions or provide feedback. It is also hard to measure the impact of this strategy on practice (Lee et al., 2021). But hearing about your experiences with this strategy has made me reconsider that!

      From my research, I recommended using Journal Clubs at the unit or organization level to share information on EBP. In a journal club, a group of nurses would meet regularly to discuss a study related to EBP, critically evaluate the study, discuss its implications for practice, and identify areas for further research (Almomami et al., 2019).

       

      References

      Almomani, E., Alraoush, T., Sadah, O., Al Nsour, A., Kamble, M., Samuel, J., Atallah, K., Zarie, K., & Mustafa, E. (2019). Journal club as a tool to facilitate evidence based practice in critical care. Qatar Medical Journal2019(2), 85. https://doi.org/10.5339/qmj.2019.qccc.85Links to an external site.

       

      Lee, C., Sparschu, D., Parker, B., Poat, C., & Smith, G. (2021). Implementation of Pre-operative Surgical Instructional Brochure Utilizing ERAS, Research, and Evidenced Based Perianesthesia Practice. Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing, 2021(4), 36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jopan.2021.06.013Links to an external site.

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionSheena Grays 

      Great post!

      Your post was very insightful on using dissemination strategies to deliver evidence-based practices (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). The efficiency of evidence-based practice starts with making educational materials accessible to clinical personnel and other stakeholders (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). Various disseminating approaches can be used to reach the audience; however, providing educational materials and utilizing social media is one of the best ways (Impacts of evidence use-hard hitting or subtle change?, 2010). The educational materials allow parties to review the material at their own pace and refer as they need to or ask questions on their own time. Furthermore, the social media route is the best way to get new evidence-based practices out to a large number of people in today’s society (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). With social media, as soon as the information is posted, interested parties can comment or ask questions about the new role out of practice within an organization (Impacts of evidence use-hard hitting or subtle change?, 2010).

      References

      Impacts of evidence use-hard hitting or subtle change? (2010). Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing7(1), 1-3. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-6787.2009.00181.xLinks to an external site.

      Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionSheena Grays 

                                                              Developing a Culture of Evidence Based Practice

    Evidence-based practices can be challenging in specific treatment settings due to current state laws, organizational policies, funding, and program staffing (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). Dissemination strategies educate the clinical body on new evidence-based practices and interventions. Many different techniques can be used to deliver evidence-based information to clinical practitioners. However, I would be more inclined to use two dissemination strategies: unit-level presentations and local distribution (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). These dissemination strategies are the most effective because they concentrate on the population of people that the information affects within the organization. In these dissemination strategies, local resources and the practical abilities of the focus group are considered (Toolkit Part 3: Dissemination strategies in evidence-based policy and practice – Fogarty international center @ NIH, n.d.). These strategies are more specialized and educate smaller groups of interested parties (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). With the smaller group settings, the clinical staff and/or key stakeholders can ask questions and become more interactive during meetings, creating a more trusted learning environment. Dissemination of information at the local level accomplishes good-quality results. Having these dissemination strategies to deliver evidence-based knowledge would create an adaptable and distinct environment appropriate for producing positive modifications (Toolkit Part 3: Dissemination strategies in evidence-based policy and practice – Fogarty international center @ NIH, n.d.). The dissemination strategies I would be least likely to use are posters and Powerpoint presentations. These methods are still preferable to some; however, they are not as effective in the dissemination process(Toolkit Part 3: Dissemination strategies in evidence-based policy and practice – Fogarty international center @ NIH, n.d.). Powerpoints and posters may lack important details because these strategies usually summarize information, missing critical components. Powerpoints can be tedious, which may cause you to lose the attention of your audience. On the other hand, posters can have too much information on them or not enough causing the audience to need clarification about the topic and causing them not to retain the essential details, which could be a barrier (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). Furthermore, there are many possible barriers to any dissemination strategy, such as department resistance. A way to overcome this barrier within a department is to encourage employees during the meetings and create an environment that leads by example. The department would need to have a few employees adhering to the new practices to show other employees how it is done. This method may attract employee interest, help overcome challenges and assist in changing the culture of the organization (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018).

     

     

    References

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    Toolkit Part 3: Dissemination strategies in evidence-based policy and practice – Fogarty international center @ NIH. (n.d.). Fogarty International Center. https://www.fic.nih.gov/About/center-global-health-studies/neuroscience-implementation-toolkit/Pages/dissemination.aspxLinks to an external site.

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionMona Bourbour Shirazi Kordi 

      Hi Sheena

      Thank you for sharing this great post. The Evidence-Based Practices which you selected are very practical in the healthcare environment. In fact, unit_ level presentations provide the opportunity for the healthcare staff and managers to get involved in practices. Utilizing local resources and having more focus on the unit problems can be more effective than any other method (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). I agree with the high-quality results of unit-based presentations because they will be more focused on educating a smaller staff group. This method encourages employees to work harder in difficult situations while they have been supported by their managers (Ginex, 2018).

      References

      Ginex P.K., 2018. Overcome Barriers to Applying an Evidence-Based Process for Practice Changehttps://voice.ons.org/news-and-views/overcome-barriers- Links to an external site.to-applying-an- Links to an external site.evidence-based-process-for-practice-change Links to an external site. 

      Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 

       National Institute for Health and Care Research,January 2019. How to Disseminate Your  Research, 

       https://www.nihr.ac.uk/documents/how-to-disseminate- Links to an external site.your-research/19951?pr= Links to an external site.

       

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionAmanda Sutherland 

      Response # 2

      Hello Sheena, thank you for your post. I agree that the culture of an organization is an important part of overcoming barriers to implementation of evidence based practice (EBP). An organizational culture that encourages implementation can either contribute to or derail the success of an initiative. Studies have even shown that aspects of the unit culture including continuing education, work efficacy, introspective performance evaluation, and cooperation between colleagues in terms of problem-solving predicted whether or not nurses utilized research in practice (Li et al., 2018). McCullough et al. found that teamwork and a belief in evidence were factors that increased adoption of a new anticoagulation dosing algorithm (2009). Nursing leadership can overcome unit culture as a barrier to EBP by implementing programs to encourage these qualities (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2018). For example, providing incentives for achieving American Nurse Credentialing Center certification in a particular specialty area, providing free access to continuing education modules, providing tuition reimbursement for higher nursing education, and staging Lunch and Learn presentations are all opportunities to foster a culture that values evidence. Administrators can also build cohesive teams by holding monthly or bimonthly team-building meetings or retreats, giving teams an opportunity to nominate each other for Great Catch and employee of the quarter awards, or giving public recognition or appreciation through writing a ‘Heartbeat’, a short public note of gratitude for a particular action or response. Administrators can also create better teamwork by encouraging a culture that examines and reshapes systems, rather than blaming individuals when issues arise.

       

      References

      Li, S. A., Jeffs, L., Barwick, M., & Stevens, B. (2018). Organizational contextual features that influence the implementation of evidence-based practices across healthcare settings: a systematic integrative review. Systematic reviews7(1), 72. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-018-0734-5

      Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 

      Powell, A. E., Davies, H. T., Bannister, J., & Macrae, W. A. (2009). Understanding the challenges of service change – learning from acute pain services in the UK. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 102(2), 62–68 https://doi.org/10.1258/jrsm.2008.080194

       Reply to Comment

  • Collapse SubdiscussionMaxine A Lewis 

    week 9 Discussion Question

                Dissemination is the process of communicating research findings in a clear and indisputable to key stakeholders and larger audiences while presenting in such a way as to facilitate change (Melnyk, and Fineout-Overholt, 2018). Dissemination should begin at the initial stage of the research process I.e identify stakeholders and Interact with them early on and maintain communication throughout the project, ideally from study planning to the dissemination of findings (NIHR, 2019). 

                 My next step is to formulate a dissemination plan: developing a goal – what do  want the audience to know what is the purpose, evaluate the audience and level of information to be disseminated. Therefor one strategy would be an initial meeting with  facility  managers stating the goal/s of the research and obtaining their approval. The stakeholders will then be the “partners/influencers”  who will oversee amplifying the  research message  planning from the beginning to ensure that the evidence produced is grounded, relevant, accessible, useful s well as assist in getting employees onboard I.e. end-users; this can also be considered as leadership endorsement. In leadership endorsement, Nurse administrators can oversee both human and material resources required for the evidenced based practice (EBP) program’s full integration. Leadership are also essential for preparing organizations for change. (Newhouse et al., 2007). 

                  Second strategy is to use traditional (series of short workshops) and nontraditional method (whiteboard animation and web-based resources) and enlist a nurse educator to spear head education. Utilizing a variety of channels, such as publications and reports, websites and other electronic communications, meetings, and conferences, person-to-person conversations, official collaborations, or information networks, is essential for effective dissemination (NIHR, 2019). According to Khammarnia et.al ( 2014) number of studies have discovered that both human and organizational issues, such as a lack of time to read books, a high workload, a shortage of people with EBP experience, and a scarcity of resources, are linked to barriers to the use of EBP as well as dissemination. Specific result cites Khammarnia et.al, individual barriers included a lack of time to read literature (83.7%), a lack of computer skills (68.8%), and a lack of English language proficiency (62.0%). Organizational barriers to EBP implementation were associated with age, educational level, job experience, and employment status.

                Resistance to change is yet another barrier but can be overcome as  EBP becomes the norm in health care, it will become easier to do so. It takes more than one person to change a practice, which is why having a culture that encourages inquiry and an evidence-based approach to care is critical Ginex, 2018). 

     References

    Khammarnia, M., Haj Mohammadi, M., Amani, Z., Rezaeian, S., & Setoodehzadeh, F. (2015). Barriers to implementation of evidence based practice in zahedan teaching hospitals, iran, 2014. Nursing research and practice, 2015, 357140. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/357140 

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. National Institute for Health and Care Research,January 2019. How to disseminate your research, https://www.nihr.ac.uk/documents/how-to-disseminate-your-research/19951?pr=Links to an external site. 

    Newhouse, R. P. , Dearholt, S. , Poe, S. , Pugh, L. C. &White, K. M. (2007). Organizational Change Strategies for Evidence-Based Practice. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration, 37 (12), 552-557. doi:10.1097/01.NNA.0000302384.91366.8f. 

    Ginex P.K., 2018. Overcome Barriers to Applying an Evidence-Based Process for Practice Changehttps://voice.ons.org/news-and-views/overcome-barriers-Links to an external site. to-applying-an-Links to an external site. evidence-based-process-for-practice-changeLinks to an external site. 

     Reply to Comment

    Collapse SubdiscussionMaxine A Lewis

    week 9 Discussion Question

    Dissemination is the process of communicating research findings in a clear and indisputable to key stakeholders and larger audiences while presenting in such a way as to facilitate change (Melnyk, and Fineout-Overholt, 2018). Dissemination should begin at the initial stage of the research process I.e identify stakeholders and Interact with them early on and maintain communication throughout the project, ideally from study planning to the dissemination of findings (NIHR, 2019). 

                 My next step is to formulate a dissemination plan: developing a goal – what do  want the audience to know what is the purpose, evaluate the audience and level of information to be disseminated. Therefor one strategy would be an initial meeting with  facility  managers stating the goal/s of the research and obtaining their approval. The stakeholders will then be the “partners/influencers”  who will oversee amplifying the  research message  planning from the beginning to ensure that the evidence produced is grounded, relevant, accessible, useful s well as assist in getting employees onboard I.e. end-users; this can also be considered as leadership endorsement. In leadership endorsement, Nurse administrators can oversee both human and material resources required for the evidenced based practice (EBP) program’s full integration. Leadership are also essential for preparing organizations for change. (Newhouse et al., 2007). 

                  Second strategy is to use traditional (series of short workshops) and nontraditional method (whiteboard animation and web-based resources) and enlist a nurse educator to spear head education. Utilizing a variety of channels, such as publications and reports, websites and other electronic communications, meetings, and conferences, person-to-person conversations, official collaborations, or information networks, is essential for effective dissemination (NIHR, 2019). According to Khammarnia et.al ( 2014) number of studies have discovered that both human and organizational issues, such as a lack of time to read books, a high workload, a shortage of people with EBP experience, and a scarcity of resources, are linked to barriers to the use of EBP as well as dissemination. Specific result cites Khammarnia et.al, individual barriers included a lack of time to read literature (83.7%), a lack of computer skills (68.8%), and a lack of English language proficiency (62.0%). Organizational barriers to EBP implementation were associated with age, educational level, job experience, and employment status.      

                Resistance to change is yet another barrier but can be overcome as  EBP becomes the norm in health care, it will become easier to do so. It takes more than one person to change a practice, which is why having a culture that encourages inquiry and an evidence-based approach to care is critical Ginex, 2018). 

     References

    Khammarnia, M., Haj Mohammadi, M., Amani, Z., Rezaeian, S., & Setoodehzadeh, F. (2015). Barriers to implementation of evidence based practice in zahedan teaching hospitals, iran, 2014. Nursing research and practice, 2015, 357140. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/357140 

    Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2018). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 

     National Institute for Health and Care Research,January 2019. How to Disseminate Your  Research, https://www.nihr.ac.uk/documents/how-to-disseminate-Links to an external site. your-research/19951?pr= Links to an external site.Newhouse,

    R. P. , Dearholt, S. , Poe, S. , Pugh, L. C. & White, K. M. (2007). Organizational Change Strategies for Evidence-Based Practice. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration, 37 (12), 552-557. doi:10.1097/01.NNA.0000302384.91366.8f. 

    Ginex P.K., 2018. Overcome Barriers to Applying an Evidence-Based Process for Practice Changehttps://voice.ons.org/news-and-views/overcome-                         barriers- Links to an external site.to-applying-an- Links to an external site.evidence-based-process-for-practice-change Links to an external site. 

     Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionAnupa Mukundram Mehta

      Great post!

      A dissemination method for EBP that I explored is presenting at an organizational conference such as a podium presentation (AHRQ, 2017). I think it is great that at conferences, nurses can learn and network with each other, as well as learn from experts in their field (Adams, 2019). When members of my unit go to national conferences, they present their findings at our next unit-based council meeting, so that we can all learn as they have. One barrier to conference attendance is the cost, as it can be too much for an individual nurse to afford. My hospital alleviates this by deciding how many nurses they will financially support to attend a particular conference.

       

      References:

      AHRQ. (2017). Communication and dissemination strategies to facilitate the use of health-related evidence. Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence | Effective Health Care (EHC) Program. Retrieved January 27, 2023, from https://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/products/medical-evidence-communication/research-protocolLinks to an external site.

       

      Adams S. (2009) Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at

      a National Conference. The Journal of School Nursing. 2009;25(4):302-313. doi:10.1177/1059840509335008Links to an external site.

       Reply to Comment

    • Collapse SubdiscussionAmanda Sutherland 

      Response #1

      Hello Maxine, thank you for your post. I wanted to expand on the concept of resistance to change and how to overcome this barrier, as it can be a part of institutional culture that makes or breaks evidence based practice implementation. As stated by DuBose and Mayo (2020), resistance is defined as a reaction or response to a threat to maintaining the status quo, and although maligned, is a normal and predictable reaction to change. As healthcare practitioners (and human beings), we often fear the unknown and loss of baseline practice. We may also mistrust leadership or perceive a lack of open communication or support for the change. According to Lewin’s Change Theory, change involves three steps: unfreezing, change, and freezing (Lewin, 1947). Nurse leaders can overcome the barrier of resistance to change to accomplish unfreezing by establishing and maintaining ongoing trust and communication, as well as by providing a lengthy training period for the change (Mathieson et al., 2019). Trust is increased when communication is thorough and timely. For example, notifying nurses of an impending change well in advance, and addressing questions and comments through a forum. Improved trust and communication can also be accomplished by providing channels for feedback before, immediately following, and throughout the duration of a practice change. For example, providing a forum, contact person, phone number, message board, comment box, or email that nurses can contact for support or to provide feedback regarding the change (Mathieson et al., 2019). Nurse leaders who expect, understand the basis for, and address resistance to change through establishment of trust and open communication are more likely to be successful in implementing and sustaining evidence based practices.

      References

      DuBose, B. M., & Mayo, A. M. (2020). Resistance to change: A concept analysis. Nursing forum, 55(4), 631–636. https://doi.org/10.1111/nuf.12479

      Lewin K. Frontiers in group dynamics: Concept, method and reality in social sciences, social equilibria, and social change. Human Relations. 1947;1:5‐41.

      Mathieson, A., Grande, G., & Luker, K. (2019). Strategies, facilitators and barriers to implementation of evidence-based practice in community nursing: a systematic mixed-studies review and qualitative synthesis. Primary health care research & development, 20, e6. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423618000488

       Reply to Comment

      Collapse SubdiscussionSheila Ankrah

      Response #2

      Hi Maxine,

      EBP Information Disseminating Strategies

      I agree with you that the use of panel presentation in disseminating evidence-based practice information has become so popular and has contributed immensely to clinical practice. According to Rolls et al. (2020), to ensure that local clinical practices are based on contemporary best practice knowledge, healthcare organizations should encourage their employees’ participation in online professional communities. As good as social media is in sourcing EBP information, one has to be very careful. According to McLead (2020), knowledge can be found in creative and unexpected places, but ensure the knowledge source is always reputable and trusted.

      References

      McLeod, C. (2020). How knowledge translation is improving during the COVID-19 pandemic. Canadian Journal of Critical Care Nursing31(3), 6–8.

      Rolls, K. D., Hansen, M. M., Jackson, D., & Elliott, D. (2020). Intensive care nurses on social media: An exploration of knowledge exchange on an intensive care virtual community of practice. Journal of Clinical Nursing (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.)29(7/8), 1381–1397. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1111/jocn.15143

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